uk-hijab

A Muslim vlogger is challenging other women to try on the traditional hijab headscarf for 15 minutes, so they can see what
When people looked at me, I no longer felt self-conscious. I felt empowered and true to myself. I believe I was able to implement the new knowledge I gained combined with what I was taught as a child, to help attain a sound understanding and an unbreakable connection with my faith.
As the relationship between growing migrant Muslim populations and the western nations that host them grows increasingly
I am drawn to the unique. As a child I was painfully reminded of my own Otherness when a neighbour's mother told me I had 'filthy black hands'. From that point onwards I have felt a natural affinity with the unusual, the different.
Before today, I was considering writing an article about the controversy of the hijab. I was considering writing about how so many people choose to wear the hijab despite the perturbing fear of being judged by different communities and for a multitude of reasons. But I was going to do that without admitting one thing which has been central to me writing it; I don't know if I want to continue wearing the hijab.
Being a Muslim woman, society has defined my life in many different ways, but one thing I can tell you, is that out of all of those adjectives, dull certainly won't appear on that list. We are always a focal point of discussion and let's face it my presence could liven up any dismal gathering. My very being is always brought to question, as many struggle to decide whether my hijab is a symbol of empowerment or mark of oppression.
As a hijab wearing Muslim woman, it pleases me to see hijabis getting recognition. Companies have noticed Muslim women's
The European Court of Justice has just ruled that religious symbols, such as hijabs, turbans and kippahs may be banned in the workplace. This is no less than an attack on people that practice a religion and are required to wear visible religious symbols; most of whom are ethnic minorities. It essentially legalises discrimination. And the right wing are celebrating.
The funniest part of the cover is that most Westerns always talk about how oppressing hijab must be and how we, Muslim women, need to be freed from such oppression, but the first thing they decide to put in a photo-shoot to look artistic and ethnic is our hijab.
The woman, 37, was a PhD student at the local university. She was married, but lived alone because her husband remarried nine years ago after she told him she didn't want children. They never divorced, however, so she was unable to leave the country without his consent.