war child

Many children we work with at War Child have known nothing but war.  Speaking of the conflict in Central African Republic, where violence between rival militias is inescapable for most, Stephanie, 15, says, "Pregnant women gave birth to a generation of kids that have war in their mind and spirit."
Young Americans and Brits in particular have a role to play. They can no longer chalk up bad policies to politicians backed by their parents. To those who say, we have enough problems at home without taking on these international challenges, we say, let us address both by tackling both. It's 'both and', not 'either or'. Our international policies, after all, are reflections of the state of our society's soul. Let's demand that our leaders represent our interests abroad by acting in the interests of those in need abroad.
Emran is an 11-year-old Afghan boy. He's speaks near perfect English. We're walking along a busy road in Central Europe, lined with seedy sex shops, dilapidated eateries and a grimy bus terminal. I'm filming him for a Channel 4 documentary - War Child - and he's been questioning me on the finer points of British culture for the past hour.
Carey Mulligan joined hundreds of people outside Downing Street on Saturday to call on the UK government to take decisive
Today, our hope that the majority chooses exclusively peace is still stronger than our fear of naivete. One war is more than enough for a lifetime, and we hope to provide a peaceful childhood for our offspring. The War Childhood Museum's message comes from a generation that learned this lesson firsthand, and never has it rung truer: peace has no alternative.
It's fantastic to see the media portraying refugees as human and hopeful and the BBC's Our Desert Home is worlds away from the regularly demonised refugees of the tabloids and poisonous political rhetoric of recent months.
Today you can protest as you sip your latte. A Facebook friend may have forwarded you a Change.org petition about something they feel strongly about. Whatever the issue - from saving the Himalayan snow leopard to taxing Top Shop - you enter your name, adding a short comment, if you can spare the time.
We care for refugees, but we should be angry as well.
Syrians have a right to seek a safer future than the reality they face now. If we can't make that happen for them in Turkey, Jordan, Iraq and Lebanon, we should not be surprised if they come and look for it here. Seeking protection and education should not be seen as a luxury and survival should never been seen as enough.