ISIS Sex Slave: Yazidi Woman, 17, Describes Horrific Ordeal At Hands Of Islamic State

08/09/2014 13:37 | Updated 08 September 2014

A teenager taken captive by ISIS has described being forced into sexual slavery by the Islamist terrorists along with 40 other women, some as young as 12.

Islamic State fighters are killing and enslaving members of Iraq's ancient religious minorities, including Assyrian Christians and the Yazidis.

The 17-year-old Yazidi, who is still in captivity, said her torturers were "people without a heart" who "do not even spare the women with small children".

She claimed the women in her group of captives - all Yazidis - were being sexually abused on a daily basis, while being held in a building with barred windows and guarded by armed men.

islamic state militants verified

The girl said Islamic State had kept her and other Yazidi girls and women as sexual slaves

"I beg you not to publish my name because I'm so ashamed of what they are doing to me," she told Italy's La Repubblica newspaper in an exclusive report.

"There's a part of me that just wants to die. But there is another part of me that still hopes that I will be saved and that I will be able to embrace my parents once again."

The paper was given a mobile number for the girl by her parents, who are in a refugee camp in Iraqi Kurdistan.

The distraught teenager added: "To hurt us even more, they told us to describe in detail to our parents what they are doing. They laugh at us because they think they are invincible.

yazidi refugees

Iraqi women at the Khazair displacement camp for those caught up in fighting around Mosul queue for food

"They consider themselves are supermen. But they are people without a heart. Our torturers do not even spare the women who have small children with them.

"Nor do they spare the girls - some of our group are not even 13 years old. Some of them will no longer say a word."

The girl was captured by ISIS in August as they attacked the town of Sinjar, forcing many Yazidi families to flee into the adjacent mountain range and face starvation and death by dehydration rather capture or execution by the fanatics.

Though most of those there ultimately escaped, many were captured by the group, which has been accused of committing ethnic cleansing in Iraq on a historic scale.

ISIS has also been forcibly converting Yazidis, whose faith dates back 4,000 years, to Islam.

YAZIDIS IN IRAQ:

The girl, whom the paper gave the pseudonym Mayat, said she wished she was dead.

"They treat us as if we are their slaves. The men hit us and threaten us when we try to resist. Often I wish that they would beat me so severely that I would die," she said.

"If one day this torture ever ends, my life will always be marked by what I have suffered in these weeks. Even if I survive, I don't know how I'm going to cancel from my mind this horror.

"We've asked our jailers to shoot us dead, to kill us, but we are too valuable for them.

"They keep telling us that we are unbelievers because we are non-Muslims and that we are their property, like war booty. They say we are like goats bought at a market."

Mayat is being held in a village south of Mosul, Iraq's second city, which fell to ISIS shortly after they pushed into Iraq.

She said she had hoped the Peshmerga Kurdish forces, which have been fighting ISIS with assistance from American airstrikes, would rescue her.

She said: "I want them to hurry up and drive them all out, because I don't know how much longer I can stand this. They've already killed my body. Now they're killing my mind."

After more than 3,000 women were abducted into slavery by ISIS in just two weeks, human rights campaigners Amnesty international told The Daily Mirror: “The victims are of all ages.

"It seems they took away entire families, all those who did not manage to flee.”

Last month two UN officials issued a joint statement on the "barbaric acts" of sexual violence committed by ISIS fighters.

The statement, reported by Newsweek, cited evidence of "savage rapes" being used as weapons of war against women and teenage boys and girls belonging to the Yazidi, Christian, Turkomen and Shabak minority groups in Iraq.

Academic and Middle East expert Haleh Esfandiari has said ISIS allow their followers to rape captured girls and women as a "reward".

"ISIS has received considerable world attention for its savage beheadings, executions of captured soldiers and men in conquered towns and villages, violence against Christians and Shiites, and the destruction of non-Sunni shrines and places of worship," she blogged for the Wall Street Journal.

"But its barbarity against women has been treated as a side issue. Arab and Muslim governments, vocal on the threat ISIS poses to regional stability, have been virtually silent on ISIS’s systemic degradation, abuse, and humiliation of women.

"To the men of ISIS, women are an inferior race, to be enjoyed for sex and be discarded, or to be sold off as slaves."

Amnesty International spokeswoman Donatella Rovera, who is in Iraq, told Huffington Post UK that, though the charity had not verified any cases of women suffering sexual abuse at the hands of ISIS, she said there was evidence that captured women were under "strong pressure to convert to Islam and strong pressure to marry (ISIS) fighters".

  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Distribution of juice drink cartons to Yazidi refugees
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near Turkey-Iraq border aty Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • An Iraqi girl from the Yazidi community is pictured in a refugee camp near Turkey-Iraq border in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
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  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near Turkey-Iraq border in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
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  • A doctor checks a Iraqi baby from the Yazidi community in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
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  • Iraqi children from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
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  • Iraqi children from the Yazidi community wait in a refugee camp nearthe Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • ILYAS AKENGIN via Getty Images
  • Iraqi people from the Yazidi community are pictured in a refugee camp near the Turkey-Iraq border at Silopi in Sirnak on August 14, 2014.
  • Ali Guven / Cihan / Barcroft.
  • Yazidis living in refugee camps in Silopi district on August 13, 2014 in Sirnak, Turkey. The group fled after attacks by ISIS militants in their homeland in the Sinjar region of Iraq. The Yazidis passed into Turkey through a border crossing and settled in unused buildings in the the Silopi district of Şırnak on August 6. Doctors dispatched by the Silopi authorities examined the Yazidis and two were hospitalised.
  • Ali Guven / Cihan / Barcroft.
  • Yazidis living in refugee camps in Silopi district on August 13, 2014 in Sirnak, Turkey. The group fled after attacks by ISIS militants in their homeland in the Sinjar region of Iraq. The Yazidis passed into Turkey through a border crossing and settled in unused buildings in the the Silopi district of Şırnak on August 6. Doctors dispatched by the Silopi authorities examined the Yazidis and two were hospitalised.
  • Ali Guven / Cihan / Barcroft.
  • Yazidis living in refugee camps in Silopi district on August 13, 2014 in Sirnak, Turkey. The group fled after attacks by ISIS militants in their homeland in the Sinjar region of Iraq. The Yazidis passed into Turkey through a border crossing and settled in unused buildings in the the Silopi district of Şırnak on August 6. Doctors dispatched by the Silopi authorities examined the Yazidis and two were hospitalised.
  • Ali Guven / Cihan / Barcroft.
  • Yazidis living in refugee camps in Silopi district on August 13, 2014 in Sirnak, Turkey. The group fled after attacks by ISIS militants in their homeland in the Sinjar region of Iraq. The Yazidis passed into Turkey through a border crossing and settled in unused buildings in the the Silopi district of Şırnak on August 6. Doctors dispatched by the Silopi authorities examined the Yazidis and two were hospitalised.
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    AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • Displaced Iraqi families from the Yazidi community cross the Iraqi-Syrian border at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014. At least 20,000 civilians, most of whom are from the Yazidi community, who had been besieged by jihadists on Mount Sinjar in northern Iraq have safely escaped to Syria and been escorted by Kurdish forces back into Iraq, officials said. The breakthrough coincided with US air raids on Islamic State fighters in the Sinjar area of northwestern Iraq on August 9, and Kurdish forces from Iraq, Syria and Turkey working together to break the siege of Mount Sinjar and rescue the displaced. AFP PHOTO/AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • Displaced Iraqi families from the Yazidi community cross the Iraqi-Syrian border at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • Displaced Iraqis from the Yazidi community cross the Syrian-Iraqi border along the Fishkhabur bridge over the Tigris River at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • Displaced Iraqis from the Yazidi community cross the Syrian-Iraqi border along the Fishkhabur bridge over the Tigris River at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • A displaced Iraqi father from the Yazidi community carries his barefoot daughter after crossing the Syrian-Iraqi border at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • Displaced Iraqis from the Yazidi community rest after crossing the Syrian-Iraqi border at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.
  • AHMAD AL-RUBAYE via Getty Images
  • A displaced Iraqi mother from the Yazidi community carries her baby to safety as after crossing the Syrian-Iraqi border at the Fishkhabur crossing, in northern Iraq, on August 13, 2014.

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