profile image

Charlie Ball

Deputy Director of Research, Higher Education Careers Services Unit (HECSU)

Charlie runs the labour market research team at HECSU and is responsible for support and research for university careers services across the UK. He is an active researcher on HECSU’s projects on graduate employment and in collaboration with external organisations. He is an expert on the employment destinations of graduates and postgraduates.
His research interests include: graduate destinations, particularly for postgraduates and for scientists; the study and career motivations of scientists and postgraduates; regional labour markets for graduates and postgraduates; migration of graduates within the UK and overseas; and student and graduate demographics, particularly for scientists and postgraduates.

Charlie is available to speak on all areas of higher education. He contributes regularly to the HECSU blog at http://hecsu.blogspot.com/ and the New Scientist blog at http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/bigwideworld/2011/07/do-we-really-need-more-science-graduates.html

What Do Graduates Do - And Where Do They Do It?

A lot of graduates struggle to find work because they limit themselves by looking for a particular kind of job in a certain part of the country. Unfortunately, our jobs market often doesn't work like that. So, if you're sure you want to do a particular job, make sure you know where those jobs are to reduce the chance of aiming for something that simply isn't there.
18/04/2013 13:42 BST

Making Sense of the Graduate Jobs Market

The reality for the majority of graduates this year is that their average starting salary will be about £20,000 - lower outside London. Most new graduates will get jobs, and will not get them on large graduate training schemes, but with small businesses and local firms.
31/01/2013 10:32 GMT

No Work Experience, No Job?

The real message to take from this new research is that, whilst work experience is vitally important, and the jobs market is tight, no matter what other news you might be reading, the outlook for new and upcoming graduates is far from hopeless.
24/01/2012 22:51 GMT