23/06/2015 10:51 BST | Updated 25/06/2015 09:59 BST

What Asperger's Syndrome Feels Like: Sensory Overload Explained In 'Trippy' Video

"I’m inhumanly good at self intelligence tests," says Louis Morel.

"But every time I leave the house or see a new human being I get overloaded with all the information that is there."

Morel is the star behind an extraordinary video on Asperger's syndrome, which offers a fascinating insight into what sensory overload feels like to people with the condition.

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"My brain gets insanely analytical about all the eccentricities of the skin, the way their eyes look and all the flipping detail," reveals Morel.

He then goes on to describe how having Asperger's is like listening to lots of different songs layered over one another.

"Think of a song that you really like, and it's like 'oh this is kind of fun'," he says, "and then another tune or another layer is added on to it. And then another layer. And another song starts playing, and another one."

The two minute film was made in collaboration with Ambitious about Autism's myVoice, which is an online space for young adults with autism to connect and discuss issues they all face.

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A series of illustrations from Morel's video where he explains what sensory overload feels like.

"The film is a brief summary of some of the extreme and trippy sensory stuff I have to deal with," writes Morel in the video description.

He goes on to explain that it is a very "varied condition", so it's important to bear in mind that not everyone with Asperger's will suffer in the same way.

He adds: "I wanted to collaborate on this film was because I wanted to be useful in any way I can and it sounded fun!"

The video comes after Danielle Jacobs, who also has Asperger's, posted a video on YouTube which showed her having a "meltdown", while her dog Samson helped to calm her down.

The clip went viral and has since had more than five million views.

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