Asperger's syndrome

everybody banner Autism apparently costs the UK £32bn per year but autism need not be a drain. The conversation must change from what it costs to what a neurodiverse workplace and society can contribute. What incentives can we provide employers?
Parents are being cautioned that they may be the last people to pick up on cues their child has Asperger’s, after two experts
everybody banner My friend Elaine is one of the best mums I know. I don't just say this because she's my friend, I say this because it's true. Her life as a mother has brought her satisfaction and joy beyond compare, but for her, every day can be a struggle to reach the peak of that satisfaction.
As a kid with AS, who suffered from limited empathy and theory of mind as a result, stories were always how I understood the world. I learnt empathy through fictional characters, through taking dilemmas I found in stories and applying them to my real life. (This created some problems when I went through the customary Enid Blyton phase. Most people don't describe things as "spiffing.")
However, here in London I was inundated with emails and messages from hundreds of adults who have Autism, each one expressing why lighting up BLUE actually offended them, deeply hurt them and misrepresented them for several reasons. These weren't petty little reasons, these had been justified by the continuous pain of being misunderstood and misrepresented.
Asperger's syndrome is a hidden disability. Walking past me on the street you would never know I had it. It's when I have to fit into a neurotypical world that the problems start. Neurotypicals are born with the skills to communicate and interact in any number of public and social situations. I was not.
Nearly every year an anger incident breaks out at home, countless of times the police have been involved and end up arresting me due to my behaviour stepping above the out-of-control zone.
Adult Life Skills hit the cinematic trail recently. Starring Jodie Whittaker, it's about a young woman who can't cope with
With Edinburgh Scotland's most popular tourist destination, the locals are used to being outnumbered by sassenachs. Things get much worse at Fringe time, and it's easy to forget there are plenty of homegrown comedians to enjoy too. Here's my recommendations for ten brilliant acts who are all as Scottish as a highland terrier chewing shortbread on Loch Lomond