ENTERTAINMENT
02/09/2019 11:17 BST | Updated 02/09/2019 13:46 BST

Jeremy Clarkson Makes Epic Who Wants To Be A Millionaire Gaffe In Question About Event He Was Actually At

Despite having actually been on Concorde's last commercial flight, he was unable to recall when it happened.

Ever since Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? returned to our screens with its infamous new Ask The Host lifeline, it was obvious it was going to spell trouble for Jeremy Clarkson in one way or another.

In this weekend’s show, the former Top Gear presenter made a rather unfortunate gaffe when asked to help contestant Sarah – despite the question she was stuck on relating to his actual lived experience.

During the show, Sarah called on Jeremy to help her out when asked “In which year did Concorde make its last commercial flight?”

“I was on its last commercial flight,” Jeremy told Sarah, who immediately let out a gasp of relief. That feeling was not to last, though.

The host continued: “They sat me next to the lavatory… or Piers Morgan, as you know him. I’m famously hopeless at remembering dates. We’re going to have to just work this out, aren’t we?”

Eventually, Jeremy tried to use the timeline of his feud with Piers Morgan to help him get to the bottom of the matter, settling on the incorrect answer of 1998.

Unconvinced, though, Sarah decided to go with 2003, after her use of the 50:50 lifeline took 1998 out of the running as a possible answer.

Fortunately, this was correct, putting her through to the next stage of the quiz, and helping her to pocket her eventual prize money of £32,000.

During the same show, Jeremy was similarly unhelpful when called on for his advice on a fashion question, after a contestant was asked “In 2017, Clare Waight Keller became the first female artistic director of which fashion house?”

Jeremy’s response? “I don’t know and I don’t care”.

Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? airs on Saturday nights at 8pm on ITV.

CORRECTION: This article originally falsely stated the final commercial Concorde flight took place in 1998. This error has now been amended.