Chronic Disease

Experts share what happens mentally, physically and emotionally when you're following this eating plan.
I live with the debilitating and incurable Ankylosing Spondylitis. It's a chronic disease which means it's not going anywhere, isn't going to kill me but does make life very, very hard. My pain can, on a very bad day, reach the level of childbirth without the obvious prospect of new life at the end of it
We're so familiar with the wellness tech for the well - trackers and monitors for every measurable body signal. It's time for the similar tidal wave for the chronically ill. It's looking very hopeful. There are four things I'm most excited about making a big difference to everyday life:
A.S. is a chronic, incurable, probably degenerative disease in the arthritis family affecting my spine, neck and other joints. It leaves me with daily flu-like fatigue. I have had these symptoms sporadically from the age of 20. Every day since I was 27, my first year of marriage. I am 43 years old.
You can try to protect yourself by wearing long sleeves and trousers tucked into socks if you are out in nature. Use a good repellent and carry a tick remover with you. There is more advice on the Lyme Disease UK site.
IBS is a common condition and it affects approximately 4 million people in the UK. It is a chronic, relapsing and often life-long condition and people suffer from significant symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating and an overwhelming sense of lethargy.
As I mentioned in my last blog rant; our own journeys are the ones that are the most important. It doesn't do us any good in being with competition with each other when the real battle we should be focusing on is only thing that really matters: the fight for good health.
The stories that feature in the media lately range from the dangerous misinformed to the intentionally comical (at least that's the desired effect; I'm certainly not laughing!) Here's 5 misrepresentation of IBD that I've spotted in the media recently...
I grant you that Gaucher disease is more widely known of today than when I was young, but by patient's telling their stories, it brings attention to rare diseases, and gives them an identity creating greater public awareness.
As a person living with Parkinson's, just like millions of other fellow sufferers, when first diagnosed, I took a crash course in scouring the Internet to educate myself. Patients generally understand and know full well the harsh reality that awaits them.