daniel hannan

What if I told you that we could leave the European Union with little risk to our economy? That we could regain control of
Over the weekend my piece on why the UK government turned away more than 2,700 non-EU nurses was widely circulated on Twitter
When I recently told a colleague that I want the UK to leave the EU, she expressed considerable dismay that someone of my background - mixed-race, working class, comprehensive education - was lining up with far-right racists. Such a misguided view of the people who support Brexit does a disservice to the millions of Britons up and down the UK, who are now in a majority that understands why it is morally, politically and economically essential for Britain to leave the EU.
Whether you're campaigning to leave or remain, surely we can all agree that asking the poorest in society to shoulder the greatest burden is a raw deal? But by refusing to address the very real consequences of EU membership, the maths of immigration, and the required investment in public services, a raw deal is exactly what's on offer.
I never thought I'd see so many people so willing to surrender the only power we have to protect ourselves from tyranny.
Vote Leave cannot credibly deny the fact that a leaving the EU would be a leap in the dark that would put the UK economy at risk. A vote to stay is a vote for certainty and to secure jobs, lower prices and financial security for British families.
People will try and tell us that this referendum deals with issues that are far too complex for the average person to understand. I believe that we actually face a very simple question: whether or not we believe in democracy? If we continue to find ourselves ruled by people we can't vote for, who are making laws we can't change, we will only have ourselves to blame.
As if that's not enough, the argument that the EU needs us because we have a deficit assumes the only good thing about trade is exports. But imports are beneficial too. If EU exports to the UK were artificially restricted, our consumers would be harmed. They would have to pay more when they shop and would have less choice. It's particularly odd to find Tory free-marketeers, who are supposed to understand the flaws of mercantilism, ignoring this point.
On Friday, the Rhodes Must Fall saga seemingly came to an end, with Oriel announcing that neither the plaque, nor the statue
This is a political and economic scandal, not to mention a human tragedy. And progressives should be saying so. But the left in the UK has ceded all the Eurosceptic terrain to the xenophobes and the "Little Englanders", to Ukip and the Tory right. We were wrong then. Let's not be wrong now.