Diagnosis

Nearly 10,000 people are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer each year in the UK – but late diagnosis often means the prognosis is bleak.
As I watched Eddie Redmayne tripping over his own legs, I became convinced that I too had Motor Neurone Disease. I was given my diagnosis three months later
everybody banner I spent a lot of time in the gym when I was teenager. Initially it was more of a social thing, but slowly exercise became a way of life for me. I imagined myself strong and healthy, and assumed I'd always be able to go for runs and lift heavy weights. What I never considered at 16 was that I'd soon be diagnosed with a condition that would force me to rethink exercise entirely.
My OCD IS part of me; it makes me who I am and I don't want to hate that anymore. Having a diagnosis has been a positive thing in a lot of ways for me but it has also made me despise this part of myself for so many years. I propose instead that we listen to our mental health illness, we try to understand it, accept it and embrace it as part of our identity.
Danny says the one thing that has really added to his severe exhaustion and frustration is having to continually explain how M.E. is not just feeling tired. By sharing his story, I hope that others affected by M.E. have to do this a little less.
Candy and Alex's experiences are far from unique. In the UK alone, 1,200 babies will be born with a cleft in 2017. It's a lifelong condition, but the journey starts at diagnosis. Many parents describe this moment as one they'll never forget, the instant when everything changed and this condition they may never have heard of before suddenly became a central part of their lives.
Last year I spent a lovely couple of weeks in France with friends. Thankfully friends who understand that I shout at them and their children. My current shout-ism is "c**k", which we've managed to pretend is "cake", "cot" and "cod" amongst many others.
So the purpose of this blog is to see the funny side of life. Life may be very difficult right now but I still have my sense of humour. I can only compare my life at the moment to one of a slug. I spend most of my time horizontal and moving slowly from room to room. The difference is I have arms so while I may feel as useless as a slug right now I still have the ability to type.
Mental health services are supposed to help. But sometimes psychiatric professionals cause damage by denting the credibility
So now, here I go again and I suppose ultimately and selfishly I wanted to feel I have gained something from my ramblings but equally if I can help others in similar situations that would be fantastic. Some of what has already been written was done with tears and some with laughter and hopefully you will see the rollercoaster life that we lead in living with autism.