Energy security

If we can avoid massive disruption of a no-deal exit, the transition period will set the tone of the UK and EU’s relationship over the coming years
Successive governments have failed to adequately plan to guarantee the energy supplies required for our economy, businesses and consumers. The UK has a poor track at delivering all manner of infrastructure projects. Persistent political short-termism means the UK's infrastructure ranks poorly compared to other developed nations. There is nowhere that this failure is better illustrated than with energy.
Energy security is one of the most talked about topics not only in terms of the debates around climate change action but also conventional policy. Energy price and stability have very real economic implications for any nation and there is now more than ever increasing concern to secure the resource by internalising energy generation.
This article is co-authored with Terry Townshend who is Head of Policy at GLOBE International It is not well know that Kazakhstan
Whether man-made climate change is occurring or not, there are few who would argue against a move towards low-carbon energy generation. One way or another, carbon emissions must be cut. Forget the tired anti-nuclear rhetoric and the ridiculous claims that a Fukushima-style disaster could hit the UK. Third generation nuclear is the way forward and the new reactors planned at Hinkley Point are the first step in the right direction.
Across the world, the contentious debate over the future of nuclear power continues apace. In East Asia, for instance, it emerged last month that a nuclear plant in Taiwan may have been leaking radio-active water for three years. Meanwhile, Japan is still struggling to contain radio-active water from Fukushima; and in South Korea prosecutors are conducting a huge investigation into forged nuclear safety certificates.
A week on from the launch of the iPhone 5 - Apple's most eagerly anticipated launch since... well, the iPhone 4 - and what have we learned?
Former energy secretary Chris Huhne is to receive a £17,000 payoff after quitting the Cabinet to fight charges of perverting