Free market

Insiders tell HuffPost UK the Brexit-delivering government will not be driven by Tory free market ideology but simply "what people care about".
Would Corbyn and McDonnell be as free market as Blair and Brown? No, but there's much for business to like in the party's economic plans
For the youth, 1994 carries the weight of unfulfilled democratic promises.
A fundamental change in the way capitalism works is essential. Cosmetic changes or just words, not backed by action, will not do. Otherwise, I fear for the cohesion of our societies with the demagogues and charlatans directing the anger and frustration of the masses, not at the economic system causing the poverty of the many, but towards the weakest, poorest and most vulnerable members of our society.
Attacks on the welfare state by politicians of all parties are now commonplace. It seems we've forgotten what the welfare state is for and why it is so important. It's time to take a fresh look at the welfare state and the game of Monopoly helps us do just that.
If we are ever to have a hope of rebalancing the books, meeting the future costs of the NHS, and satisfying our pension liabilities we need to look beyond capitalism. It's served a fortunate few well, but it has failed the majority. It's time to bury it alongside socialism and look for a better successor to both.
Owen Jones uses an impressive amount of official government data to present what some critics have predictably deemed a conspiracy theory. Such an obvious and flattering denunciation only proves what we already know: Jones has the establishment clutching at their golden little straws.
The Labour Party's recent policy announcements leave me in absolutely no doubt about their basic principle: they think you are too stupid to manage your own life, so they want to do it for you.
Free-market (neo-liberal) capitalism has been the dominant type of capitalism for the last three decades; it failed spectacularly to predict the 2008 global economic crash, the second largest economic crisis in history, after the great depression.
Mrs Thatcher was not universally adored, and the public ceremony she was accorded, unsurprisingly riled the many Britons who did not prosper during her time in office. For them, the tide of effusive public tributes were indulgent, partisan displays of hero worship.