jonathan portes

Britons' fears about immigrants are misplaced, according to a leading economist - who said reduced immigration would lead
George Osborne has indicated there will be no further cuts to benefits, after he revealed seven government departments had
The work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith has been accused of "misrepresenting" statistics on welfare to falsely
One of the chancellor's closest allies has said that George Osborne "should stick to the strategy" of deficit reduction, despite
One of the chancellor's closest allies has said that George Osborne "should stick to the strategy" of deficit reduction, despite
Immigration is in the news once again. Not that it ever leaves it. A complex issue made harder by distortions, stereotypes, and populism. One could argue that its social and cultural effects are the trickiest to articulate and hardest to pin down. Certainly not easy to capture in a dry opinion poll.
In the Autumn Statement the chancellor decided to cut working age benefits and tax credits, thus reversing his previous (sensible) policy of allowing the "automatic stabilisers" to operate, and ignoring the advice of the IMF.
Just as talk about a "double-dip recession" after the unusually bad second quarter growth figures was overdone, so was the
On the eve of the chancellor's Autumn Statement, Mehdi Hasan meets leading economist Jonathan Portes to discuss the prospects