Overpopulation

A concerted effort to change social norms and access to contraception could make a huge difference to how things pan out for humanity over coming decades
"Humanity will eventually pay a very high price."
Scientists have warned that the Earth’s next major extinction event has already started and unless serious measures are put
There's an overpopulation problem alright, but not the one you might think. There are seven billion people on our planet
"The days of irregular migration to Europe are over", announced European Council President Donald Tusk on 7 March 2016. If
Stabilizing our population is not risky, expensive or complicated. We can address an ageing society by improving productivity and ensuring all of our people are capable of doing our jobs and enabled to do so.
Women not having children historically bothers authority. And while they may do so for myriad reasons today, as more and more women follow suit and cite the environment as the cause, it will be interesting to see what happens: whether politicians, apparently deaf to the marches, petitions and scientists, will listen to prospect of our hollow wombs.
It is a brilliant solution to reduce overpopulation and its results shows its effectiveness, but no more. Simply put, the costs of this solution, outweigh the benefits that it would bring. It worked in the past, but even the Chinese government has acknowledged the problems it's created and thus, step-by-step the one-child policy is being loosened.
Overconsumption and overpopulation are intertwined. The prospect of 10 billion people or more living as we in the developed nations do now is frightening but unrealistic, I think; environmental degradation will crush that aspiration before it can reach full term.
Most population growth is happening in the developing world. The clue is in the name - many developing nations are on their way up. Endeavouring to curb population growth can only be a positive thing. Many of the actions we could take are intrinsically humanitarian in themselves.