palliative care

More recently, the new inspection regime introduced by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) - the regulator for health and adult social care in England - is helping provide a better understanding of quality in hospice care.
The reality is that hospice care is delivered in a surprising range of settings, including in people's homes. In fact 90% of hospice care is delivered away from a hospice building. Hospice teams are also involved in educating staff working in other settings such as care homes and hospitals.
Breast Cancer Care recently surveyed women and men affected by secondary breast cancer, which cannot be cured. We wanted to establish if they were in pain because of the side effects of their cancer and treatment. Shockingly, we found that 90% of them were, many of them on a near daily basis.
These are tough economic times for statutory funding of healthcare. It would be unrealistic to expect NHS funding for hospice care, which has on average made up a third of funding (32 per cent) for adult hospices and 17 per cent for children's services, to be exempt from this.
Is it depressing to work at hospice? As a music therapist specializing in hospice I've been asked this question many times
Today marks the start of Children's Hospice Week - seven days of awareness raising, highlighting the vital care and support that these services provide to seriously ill children and their families.
My facebook timeline was flooded with selfies this morning. Bare-faced, no-filter (ahem) selfies, posted by friends in the name of cancer awareness and asking others to do the same. In my usual bleary-eyed, early morning confusion I couldn't understand why, on a social networking site where most of us scroll mindlessly through the interminable selfies of the people on our friends list every single day, another selfie would help cure cancer.
Fuelled by the growth of electronic medical records, according to The Telegraph people of all ages are waking up to the potential
What is perhaps less well reported is that there are also thousands of people every year who are living with cancer long term, struggling to maintain their standard of living. And, while treatment has advanced significantly since the 1960s, palliative care has not.
An independent review of a controversial end-of-life regime is likely to recommend that it is phased out, it has emerged