pharmacists

If the government does not change course and listen to frontline pharmacists desperately trying to make them see sense, I foresee a desperately bleak future for community pharmacy and indeed the whole of the NHS - a hole in the high street and in the chain of healthcare that will never be filled.
Our solution to this problem was to increase the number of languages and the number of pharmacies enrolled so that each pharmacy can give us fewer surveys and we can still hit data collection targets.
But don't take my word for it, ask the Blair Government, or Gordon Brown's...or even David Cameron's for that matter. You see, community pharmacy owners have heard this phrase repeated for a very, very long time now. And, of course, they're absolutely right.
You can’t avoid it; in every newspaper, every day, another story about the NHS under increasing strain from all areas. Statistics
If the government wants to improve patient access it should invest in this; in allowing community pharmacies to help, instead of closing 'potentially' a quarter of them. Instead of being forced to go to your GP you can walk in to the pharmacist with no appointment and be seen, in most cases, immediately.
I wrote in my article earlier this week that pharmacists save lives, and was asked on this very page to back up my claim
As a passionate advocate of joined-up patient care, I have long been concerned by the omission from discussions about the future of the NHS of a key healthcare profession - pharmacy. It is estimated that one in seven GP visits could be effectively dealt with by a local pharmacist - at significantly less cost to an NHS that is battling a tough savings target and growing demand.
The introduction of smaller-sized packets of paracetamol has led to a 43% reduction in the number of poisoning deaths, a