WaterAid

A clear, standalone goal for water and sanitation and the recognition in the other goals of the fundamental nature of Goal 6 was essential to achieve the scale of ambition needed to eradicate extreme poverty.
One year on from the adoption of the UN's new Sustainable Development Goals, they look something akin to a Rubik's Cube. The 17 Goals, and 169 targets within those, applicable to 193 countries, are a colourful and immensely challenging combination puzzle. One cannot be solved without the others; they are inter-dependent.
We need to talk openly about this issue to remove the stigma that surround periods, and ensure finding solutions for menstrual hygiene management are included in efforts to improve health, education, and access to sanitation facilities. Fu Yuanhui is one sportswoman who inadvertently shined a spotlight on this issue. But together, we can all help break the stigma surrounding periods.
Water is a vital resource, and access a basic human right. By working together, we can create bigger impact and empower local communities affected by water scarcity and poor sanitation, in order to reach everyone, everywhere by 2030.
Scouts in Madagascar are delivering menstrual hygiene education and helping dispel the mystery and myths that surround periods. They also campaign for clean water and toilets for all. This is a huge issue. More than one billion women have no access to a private toilet, making it difficult to manage their periods hygienically.
A key message of the Global Nutrition Report is that ending malnutrition is a political choice that is achievable, but only with an increase in effective funding and infrastructure and much more efficient coordination across relevant sectors. This is true for malnutrition, for access to water, sanitation and hygiene, and for eradicating extreme poverty.
Amid all the recent headlines around the UK's overseas aid, there was one very positive one last week: evidence of tens of millions of lives transformed.
To reach everyone everywhere by 2030 with safe water, decent toilets and hygiene will require coordinated efforts from governments at all levels as well as from those working on education, health and human rights. It's an ambitious goal - but the costs of failure will be even higher.
Taps and toilets, things we so easily take for granted, really do transform lives. I'm so proud that Scouts in the UK have chosen to take action on this important issue. In just one week, we learned so much about how we can join together with our Scout family in Madagascar, and across the world, to help get clean water and toilets for everyone, everywhere.
We need to get different sectors talking. Climate change and water are intertwined and we need to speak each other's language when it comes to planning and funding adaptation efforts. We can no longer have countries develop water policies that don't include climate risks, nor can climate planners operate without consulting key water ministries.