West Africa

The vaccine could control a new outbreak of the Zaire strain.
An experimental vaccine tested on humans has been found to provide 100 per cent protection against the deadly Ebola virus
Humanitarian aid is usually most needed in some of the most difficult places on the planet. These are places that lack what we take for granted such as water, food and safety but instead have plenty of conflict, food insecurity and disease. If you are a child in a place like that life is difficult, often far too short and full of terrible choices.
It's 3pm in central Monrovia, Liberia. Crowds of noisy, staggering men congregate around the outside of a collapsing, rotten three story building in the drizzling rain.
It is worth noting that the impact of the outbreak was not just restricted to public health consequences. There are also social and economic issues, such as stigma associated with surviving infection and an estimated USD$2.2 billion lost in economic growth during 2015 across the three countries where the virus took hold.
Ebola no longer makes the headlines, driven out by news of Zika virus and the crisis in Syria. But the terrible legacy of Ebola persists in West Africa, for the survivors who suffer stigma and fear long-term complications, and for all of those who are vulnerable and in need of healthcare at a time when the health system has been brought to its knees.
Four Al-Qaeda militants have been killed after Burkina Faso and French forces stormed a luxury hotel on Saturday, freeing
"Our challenge was really to educate the communities when it comes to hygiene practices, to help prevent further spread of Ebola", says Bob. "I think it was a real eye-opener for everybody involved.
2015 has not been a good year for Africa's cocoa belt. Dry weather and a lack of pesticides in Ghana, and wet weather and a hike in export taxes for grinders in Ivory Coast are likely to result in a huge shortfall of beans and grindings available from the world's top cocoa producers.