workers rights

Patel told Radio 4 that the EU had done nothing to defend workers' rights, and every protection we have was down to the British Government. While it's certainly true that these rights aren't gifts from Brussels bureaucrats, it's breath-taking to suggest we should be thanking Priti and her right-wing chums for them either.
If Monday's decision to turn down a stand at Labour conference focuses attention on trade union non-recognition at McDonalds, it's worth it. As a letter this week in The Guardian from unions and others put it "We say to McDonald's: if you can rebrand so much in your stores, from store layout to children's meals, surely you can adapt your business model, with the mega profits generated by your workforce, to recognise your workers' union and meet with the BFAWU now."
The first of May every year is universally known as May Day and May Day is most commonly identified as International Workers
Voting to leave the EU would be a big risk for every working person. It would leave them haunted by years of uncertainty, with rights like paid holiday, parental leave and equal treatment for part-timers at risk of being whittled away. Generations of trade unionists fought hard to win the rights that the EU now guarantees. If we lose them because of Brexit, it could take generations to get them back again. The biggest cheerleaders for Brexit think that your protections at work are just red tape to be binned. Bad bosses will be rubbing their hands with glee if leaving the European Union gives them the chance to cut back workers' hard-won protections. We shouldn't give them that opportunity.
TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady has rightfully warned that David Cameron that he is in great danger of losing the referendum if he doesn't start telling working people what's in it for them. And given that this report shows that trade unions can play a crucial role in mobilising for a Remain vote, it's time he stopped his unnecessary and divisive attacks on unions.
The 1st April sees an increase in the minimum wage, rebranded as the National Living Wage, to £7.20 for those over 25 years of age. But one group of workers - cycle couriers - will be denied this modest boost to their income.
As shoe consumption continues to rise, it is vital that we stop the exploitation and poverty trap that women homeworkers find themselves in. The answer is not the knee-jerk reaction that some brands may advocate of banning homeworking from their supply chains.
Many of the employment rights we now take for granted - things like health and safety protections and legal entitlement to breaks - were secured through hard-fought battles by trade unions and their members. It's up to young workers to act together to resist new forms of exploitation.
The VIOME worker-occupied factory in Thessaloniki. Credit: Joel Benjamin Greek workers have shown that bosses and owners
Ambulances have been called to the headquarters of Sports Direct 82 times in the last two years amid reports workers were