STYLE

Emma Watson Explains How Her Beauty And The Beast Costume Was Sustainable And Eco-Friendly

She's our eco-warrior 🙌 🌎

30/03/2017 10:17 BST

Not only did Emma Watson champion the removal of the restrictive corset, but now we’ve learned she also included an eco-friendly outfit in Beauty And The Beast

Watson has been proving her dedication to sustainable fashion for months now, and yesterday the actress shared an image on her recently created Instagram account, @the_press_tour, of another eco-friendly ensemble.  

The account - which has amassed nearly 500,000 followers already - was set up to champion ethical and sustainable practices within the fashion industry whilst the actress carries out a promotional tour for the film.

The five-layer period piece was created by Oscar-winning costume designer Jacqueline Durran, Eco-Age, and Disney - who all collaborated together to create the 100 percent sustainable look. 

Watson’s character Belle, wore it during the musical number ‘Something There’ in the film, and it looked incredible. 

Sharing all the details on Instagram, the outfit took a whole lot of people from around the world to make it work: 

“The cape was made from upcycled, traditionally woven British Jacob’s wool from around 1970, bought at a vintage fair,” Watson wrote.

“The jacket was made using hand-woven linen from the 1960s sourced from eBay, over-dyed using low impact dyes.

“The off-white Peace Silk taffeta for the top skirt is Fair Trade certified and produced by a small hand-weaving unit in Cambodia.

“The hide for the boots was produced using the most advanced environmentally respectful techniques such as chrome-free tanning, and solvent-free finishing.”

Belle’s red dress and cape in @beautyandthebeast was a special ethical costume that we put together with @ecoage, Oscar-winning costume designer Jacqueline Durran and @disney 💚🌹 The cape was made from upcycled, traditionally woven British Jacob’s wool from around 1970, bought at a vintage fair. The fabric was overdyed using natural dyes, and the lining was made from paperlike Tussah silk. The jacket was made using hand-woven linen from the 1960s sourced from eBay, overdyed using low impact dyes. The fabric was from an old school project and was hand woven in the UK, and came with original labels and dates of manufacture. The blue and red stripe lining was sourced from a wonderful Indian supplier, who hand weaved and herbal dyed this GOTS certified organic cotton. The apron was made from a GOTS certified organic linen. The pattern was hand painted by London based artist Oliver Kilby, who also hand painted accessories for Belle’s other costumes. The off-white Peace Silk taffeta for the top skirt is Fair Trade certified and produced by a small hand-weaving unit in Cambodia. The edge facing fabric was made of the same silk, naturally dyed with madder, and printed using a hand block technique. The main GOTS certified organic cotton for the underskirt is overdyed with low impact dyes. The hide for the boots was produced using the most advanced environmentally respectful techniques such as chrome-free tanning, and solvent-free finishing. The front panel of the bodice was made from hand woven nettle, local communities harvest wild nettles in altitudes ranging from 1200m to 3000m, processing the fibres using traditional methods. The brown and beige stockings are made from organic cotton and hemp, a fibre which can be grown without pesticides or herbicides.

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Watson, once again, proved that an entire outfit can be fully sustainable.