First World War

Heard Again: The Forgotten Voice of the Boys Who Won the First World War

Stephen Cooper | Posted 11.04.2014 | UK Sport
Stephen Cooper

Much recent writing on the Great War has veered between the highest-ranked and the humble: a determined rehabilitation of Haig at one end, with plain-spoken voices from the ranks at the other, whether individual Tommies who survived to tell their story, or whole battalions of 'Pals'. Lost in all this has been the story of the men arguably most responsible for British obduracy and eventual success - the officers of the line.

The Changing Role of Women

Maria Miller | Posted 07.03.2014 | UK Politics
Maria Miller

This weekend we mark the 103rd International Women's Day. It's an opportunity to celebrate women's social, economic and political achievements and, just as importantly, to highlight the barriers to full equality that still exist, more than a century on.

World War 1 Battle Of The Somme Installation Marks Centenary

PA | Posted 02.03.2014 | UK

A poignant installation made up of paper and cardboard takes visitors on a journey back in time to show the hardships and struggles of soldiers in the...

A Global Battlefield

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 20.02.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Lest we forget, this year marks the 100th anniversary of the war that shaped the 20th century. The first of three world wars (two hot and one cold), this conflict is remembered once a year as a lesson in human suffering, as a reminder that the war to end all wars was only the beginning of the human cost of the past century.

Imprisoned Conscientious Objectors Used 'Toilet Paper Journal'

Huffington Post UK | Posted 18.02.2014 | UK

Conscientious objectors who were imprisoned for their beliefs during the First World War kept in touch with each other in prison by circulating a jour...

BBC Coverage of First World War Will Take 2,500 Hours of Breath From Public

Gregor Smith | Posted 13.04.2014 | UK Universities & Education
Gregor Smith

We should reflect on the causes and how to prevent a repeat of the massive, inhumane loss of life that the 'Great War' brought about. We should be doing that regardless of whether the number of years can make the graphics look pretty. But there are so many other conflicts that need documentaries made about them.

Why the World Won't Fall Out Over the First World War Centenary

Sunder Katwala | Posted 13.04.2014 | UK
Sunder Katwala

As the British government seeks to ensure that centenary activities fully mark the contribution of Empire and Commonwealth soldiers, can it find common ground to reflect Australian and Canadian pride in the birth of a nation, Indian and Pakistani concerns about getting the form of recognition right, and South African scepticism about the contemporary relevance of a conflict fought between long lost Empires?

How Much Do You Know About WW1?

Huffington Post UK/PA | Posted 11.02.2014 | UK

How much do you know about the First World War? Trenches, the Western Front, the Somme, poison gas and young men being mowed down with industri...

WWI - Remember the World as Well as the War

John Worne | Posted 12.04.2014 | UK
John Worne

Just like the courtesy of learning a few words of the language, for someone from the UK travelling to countries with different memories of WWI than ours, learning a little more about the scale and legacy of this truly global conflict can be invaluable in effectively navigating and building relationships of trust.

Why Things Can Only Get Worse in 2014

Hugh Salmon | Posted 16.03.2014 | UK Politics
Hugh Salmon

The dawn of a New Year is a looking forward to what is to come and for reflection, a time for taking stock. There are two things we know will happen during 2014...

'Stress and the Strain': Personal Memories, National Narratives, and the First World War

Jamie Andrews | Posted 10.03.2014 | UK
Jamie Andrews

My granddad died a year ago. We've been clearing out his papers. Like so many men of his generation (he was born in 1921), his early adult life was cut around the events of the Second World War. And, like many of his generation, his was not the first experience of war-service in the family. Amongst the papers he left, we also came across documents and letters about his own father's service in what became the First World War...

Baldrick Calls Gove's Blackadder Criticism 'A Very Silly Mistake'

The Huffington Post UK | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK

Michael Gove has made "a very silly mistake" for criticising Blackadder as a "left-wing" whitewash of British pride in World War One, according to Bal...

Post Traumatic Stress to Post Traumatic Growth - a Journey of Personal Innovation and Adventure

Martina Keens-Betts | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Martina Keens-Betts

My Grandfather tragically lost his friend on the battlefield and suffered from depression for the rest of his life, which rendered him unable to speak for the days surrounding 11 November. My Great Uncle was severely, severely shell shocked and as an additional complication, the PTSD triggered psychotic episodes during which there was an attempt to break into Buckingham Palace.

Should We Also Remember Those Who Refused To Fight?

The Huffington Post UK | Tom Moseley | Posted 10.11.2013 | UK

On Remembrance Sunday, Britain falls silent to honour the sacrifices made by servicemen and women. But should those who refused to take part in the...

Matthew Tucker

'War Is Organised Murder'

HuffingtonPost.com | Matthew Tucker | Posted 10.11.2013 | UK

On Armistice Day, we can think of no better tribute than to give you the damning verdict on war, massacre and brutality, from the mouths of those who ...

Black History Month Is About Asians Too

Shahida Rahman | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK
Shahida Rahman

October marks Black History Month which embraces the history of African, Caribbean and Asian people who have a direct link with the UK through slavery, colonialism or migration. Lascars, or South Asian sailors, must be included in this significant group of survivors.

Paxman Tells Dave: Only A Moron Would Celebrate War

PA/The Huffington Post UK | Posted 18.02.2014 | UK

Jeremy Paxman has taken David Cameron to task for his comments that Britain's marking of the WWI centenary would be like the "Diamond Jubilee celebrat...

Why Do We Call Chemical Weapons "Weapons of Mass Destruction"? They're Nothing Of The Sort

Brendan O'Neill | Posted 03.11.2013 | UK Politics
Brendan O'Neill

All of us have a visceral, emotional reaction to the use of chemical weapons. It repulses us... Yet there's a question that must be asked: why are we more offended by the killing of civilians with chemical weapons than we are by the slaughter of far greater numbers of civilians with conventional weapons?

Why Germany Is Still Recovering Its War Dead

David Crossland | Posted 15.10.2013 | UK
David Crossland

Quietly and methodically, Germany has been recovering the bodies of hundreds of thousands of its soldiers who fell on its Eastern Front in the bloodie...

Young Children Should Be Included in World War One Commemorations Too

Hilary Robinson | Posted 15.09.2013 | UK
Hilary Robinson

At present two children from every state secondary school in England from spring until March 2019 will be given the opportunity to visit First World War battlefields. But it is our hope too that children of primary school age will be able, in their own way and suited to their needs, share in that witness as well.

'EastEnders' Writer Pens WW1 Drama

PA | Posted 09.04.2013 | UK Entertainment

EastEnders writer Tony Jordan is behind a new series following the fate of two young soldiers in the First World War. The Great War, which will str...

All Quiet on the Western Front: The Christmas Truce

Tony Mckenna | Posted 22.04.2013 | UK Politics
Tony Mckenna

Like smoke drifting across no man's land as the sound of the guns and the mortar finally fell quiet, the Christmas truce of 1914 has been shrouded by the mists of time. A historical event which occurred early in the First World War and one many of us are familiar with; yet it has the feel and texture of legend as much as fact.

Halabja and the Dangers of Mustard Gas

Michael Freemantle | Posted 03.02.2013 | UK Tech
Michael Freemantle

Mustard gas is actually not a gas but a thick viscous liquid that can remain on the ground for years when conditions are right. The chemical releases a vapour that is either odourless or smells of mustard depending on the purity of the liquid.

Matthew Tucker

Tortured Poet Edward Thomas Brought To Life: The Dark Earth And The Light Sky (REVIEW)

HuffingtonPost.com | Matthew Tucker | Posted 23.12.2012 | Home

Muddy ploughed fields, crisp clear mornings and all the birds of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire - a profound love affair with the English country...

The Other Poppies of War

Michael Freemantle | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Tech
Michael Freemantle

Opium poppy extracts and their chemical derivatives were and still are invaluable in relieving the suffering of the wounded. It is therefore safe to say that both the opium poppy and the red poppy, or least the artificial variety, have been employed to bring immense relief to members of the armed forces, albeit in totally different ways.