Regulation

A Range of Voices in the Press Is Not Enough, We Need a Range of Pictures, Too

Clare Finney | Posted 31.07.2014 | UK
Clare Finney

Like many journalists, I revel in the cacophony of voices our papers present - but that is not enough. Humans see as well as listen. To ensure balance - of news, comment or of features - we need a range of photos too.

Changing Values and Internet Versus TV Watershed

Pippa Smith | Posted 21.07.2014 | UK Entertainment
Pippa Smith

While the watershed does usefully remind us that there is offensive and harmful material on our screens after 9.00pm, with the challenge posed by the internet and on demand TV is the watershed past its sell by date?

Does Facebook (Like Barclays) Operate a Dark Pool?

Richard Stacy | Posted 03.07.2014 | UK Tech
Richard Stacy

Facebook needs to generate sufficient revenue to justify a valuation north of $80 billion - and it is not going to do that simply through selling advertising, it is going to do that by selling access to its pool of data... data about human behaviour.

Black Cabs Cannot Stand in the Way of Innovation

Simon Walker | Posted 11.06.2014 | UK
Simon Walker

The Cabbies may be right. Transport for London, which regulates taxis, has asked the High Court to rule on whether the business model is illegal, a claim which Uber strongly rejects. But if anyone thinks that a court judgement will be the end of it, they are sorely mistaken.

A Nation of Part-Time Portfolio Entrepreneurs

Adam Afriyie | Posted 06.07.2014 | UK Politics
Adam Afriyie

It's perfectly possible for people to start a business from home. Today there are more people running their own businesses around full-time work than ever before. The Internet allows portfolio careers to flourish and the government must support this groundswell of eager new business people.

Is the Present System of Consumer Protection Up to the Job?

Richard Lloyd | Posted 01.07.2014 | UK Politics
Richard Lloyd

It's good for the economy if action by regulators helps drive consumer demand for the best businesses, supporting their growth, incentivising efficiency and innovation. That, obviously, is what Which? has been about since the 1950s. But is the present system of consumer protection up to the job?

Are You Reading the Signs?

Pam Warren | Posted 24.06.2014 | UK
Pam Warren

Is it just me or are there more signs everywhere you go? Over the past few months I seem to have noticed more things I am supposed to read, digest and either act upon or, in most cases, not act upon. There are instructions, rules and some very strict ones where I feel I am being told off before I've done anything!

Financial Regulators Must Show They Mean Business

Richard Lloyd | Posted 01.06.2014 | UK
Richard Lloyd

If the industry doesn't get things right they only need to look to other failing markets to see what might be in store. With the referral of the energy market to the competition commission last week, Which? wants wider recognition that radical action is needed when competition is failing and markets aren't working for consumers.

Transforming Banking at Its Core to Embrace the Digital Opportunity

Tony Virdi | Posted 26.05.2014 | UK Tech
Tony Virdi

This personalised, mobile, social experience can only occur if the banking and financial services industry continues to transform its technology platforms and solutions, with the ultimate aim being channel integration and embracing the digital opportunity.

Another Propaganda Exercise - How the World's Top Editors Have Colluded in a British Press Deceit

Professor Steven Barnett | Posted 17.05.2014 | UK
Professor Steven Barnett

It is a great shame that this apparently experienced international delegation fell wholesale for the self-serving corporate blather of UK publishers. Of course there are differences of opinion and passionately held views on a difficult issue. But there was no excuse for systematically ignoring those of us who gave up significant time to explain some basic, underlying facts about Britain's press history and political constitution.

Governments Must Do More to Help Charities Earn Public Trust

John Low | Posted 20.04.2014 | UK
John Low

Unfortunately in too many countries charities face a climate of suspicion and repression. Heavy handed government policy and the politicisation of charity regulation is undermining the trust of the public which is vital in the development of a thriving charity sector and civil society more broadly.

For Regular Regulation Wherever a Child Resides

Jonathan Stanley | Posted 07.04.2014 | UK Politics
Jonathan Stanley

The current discussion over Ofsted concerns personalities - the chair, the chief inspector, and the minister. It's missing an important point...

Where the UK Leads, the EU Should Follow

David Rutley | Posted 06.04.2014 | UK Politics
David Rutley

If we can spread our positive vision of a reformed Europe in a global economy, EU reform will not just be possible, it will be unstoppable. By showing our neighbours what we can achieve domestically with deregulatory reform, we are leading by example. And if they don't follow? That will make any in/out referendum very interesting indeed.

Asia-Pacific Is Leading the World on Carbon Emissions Trading

Adam Matthews | Posted 10.03.2014 | UK
Adam Matthews

This article is co-authored with Terry Townshend who is Head of Policy at GLOBE International It is not well know that Kazakhstan -- a nation whose l...

Government Plans Could See a Quarter of Punters Drift to the Black Market

Peter Howitt | Posted 11.02.2014 | UK Politics
Peter Howitt

The only real winner under the current proposals would not be the consumers who need protecting, nor the government wishing to raise revenues, but instead the unscrupulous black market bookmakers capitalising on the misfortune of firms currently championed for their regulatory excellence.

Protecting Your Licence to Operate in the Future

Sara Benwell | Posted 21.12.2013 | UK
Sara Benwell

Normally, when people talk about reputation management they immediately think of crisis communications and the importance of protecting a company's br...

Freedom of Information: The British Press and the Royal Charter

Tony Mckenna | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Politics
Tony Mckenna

There is a wonderfully funny scene in the film Groundhog Day. The main character - played with laconic, dead-pan charm by Bill Murray - has been co...

Curvy Cucumbers and High-Heeled Hairdressers Welcome in Brussels

Giles Goodall | Posted 23.01.2014 | UK Politics
Giles Goodall

The EU gets a lot of bad press in Britain for its perceived addiction to pointless and occasionally bizarre regulations. Who could forget the reports about straight bananas, fishermen's hairnets and a ban on topless builders?

As IPCC Launches Landmark Study, Is the Tide Turning on Tackling Climate Change?

Andrew Hammond | Posted 01.10.2013 | UK
Andrew Hammond

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released last Friday the most comprehensive ever study on global warming. The landmark report, prepared by more than 200 scientists over two years, concludes that global temperatures could rise by up to 4.8 Celsius (8.6 Fahrenheit) by the end of this century compared to pre-industrial levels, but could potentially still be held to 0.3 C (0.5 F) with deep, speedy cuts in emissions.

In Science, Slow and Steady Wins the Race

Gates Cambridge Scholars | Posted 21.08.2013 | UK Universities & Education
Gates Cambridge Scholars

Medical associations have begun to discount CCSVI now that more evidence has emerged, but the story of CCSVI serves as an important example of the need for rigorous, randomised, controlled clinical trials of medical treatments before they are unleashed on a desperate patient population.

Do Banks Still Need Branches? Only If Offered as an Olive Branch Bridging Between Traditional and Online Worlds

Tony Virdi | Posted 31.07.2013 | UK
Tony Virdi

There is no simple answer to whether retail banks still need branches for customers to visit. The truth is that, even though regulation and technology is moving at pace, it will depend on the bank, the region and the customer.

Train Punctuality: Are We Measuring the Wrong Thing?

Karan Chadda | Posted 02.06.2013 | UK Politics
Karan Chadda

Here's a question that's not often asked: what if train punctuality is a false measure? Perhaps commuter punctuality is what we should really care about? Instead of the number of trains getting to stations on time, perhaps we would get more useful information if we tracked the number of people being delivered to stations on time.

Why Regulatory Compliance for Financial Services is Akin to Road Maintenance

Tony Virdi | Posted 28.05.2013 | UK Tech
Tony Virdi

With so much change in a what is often a 'spaghetti of legacy / new systems and processes' it will always be challenging and costly to make structural changes; hence banks will often take the least contentious path. After all, regulatory change is not revenue-generating and times are tough.

Banking Reforms - Is the Tail Wagging the Dog?

Tom Davies | Posted 27.05.2013 | UK Politics
Tom Davies

The politicization of banking reforms makes a mockery of the problem at hand. Regulators at all levels should have unchecked power to impose reforms as they see fit. When it comes to regulation, the Basel committee should not be making concessions to the private sector whatsoever.

Wia and Nfib Will Finally Combat Wine Investment Fraud

Peter Shakeshaft | Posted 28.04.2013 | UK
Peter Shakeshaft

The start of 2013 has heralded many good headlines about the health of fine wine investment and it's looking like a positive year for investors.