Dr. James Kinross

Consultant Colorectal surgeon at King Edward VII’s Hospital & computational biologist interested in how bacteria cause disease and how big data can improve the precision of cancer therapy.

James Kinross is a consultant colorectal surgeon and senior lecturer at Imperial College London. He also consults at King Edward VII’s Hospital London. His clinical interests are in minimally invasive, laparoscopic and robotic surgery for the treatment of colorectal cancer and benign conditions of the colon and rectum such as diverticulosis and inflammatory bowel disease. A major theme in his research is the role of the gut microbiome (the hundreds of trillions of bacteria that reside within the colon) in the cause of colon cancer, crohn's disease and obesity. He is also developing intra-operative mass spectrometry techniques (known as the iKnife) for improving precision in the surgical treatment of colorectal cancer.

He was trained in Northwest London and at St. Mary’s Hospital and he was an NIHR Clinical Lecturer in Surgery and an Ethicon Laparoscopic Fellow in Colorectal Surgery. He performed his PhD at Imperial College London in 2010, which studied how bacteria in the gut modify inflammation after surgery. He was awarded a Royal College of Surgeons of England training fellowship during his PhD and he was funded by the Academy of Medical Sciences as an early stage lecturer. He is a visiting Professor at the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland.

He is currently funded by the NIHR, Bowel and Cancer research and the Imperial BRC. You can follow him on Twitter at @bowelsurgeon. He has published over 60 peer reviewed papers and authored several book chapters on surgery.

http://www.kingedwardvii.co.uk/consultants/surgical-specialities/james-kinross/
The Drugs Don't Work: Antibiotic Resistance And The End Of Modern

The Drugs Don't Work: Antibiotic Resistance And The End Of Modern Medicine

Bacteria are very clever. Resistance to drugs can be acquired by sharing mobile genetic units (called plasmids) between bacteria; this is known as "horizontal' evolution. When resistant bugs are in the hospital where you are getting treatment, it is therefore very easy for them share resistance genes.
15/11/2017 15:02 GMT
Gut Bacteria And The Obesity Epidemic - The Gut Microbiome Weight Loss

Gut Bacteria And The Obesity Epidemic - The Gut Microbiome Weight Loss Diet

A recent discovery has been that <u><strong>the bacteria within our gut play an important role in determining our weight</strong></u>. Your <strong>"genome"</strong> (all the genes that code and make you) is dwarfed by the gut "microbiome" (the microbial genes that reside within your gut) - a massive, <strong>highly individualised engine</strong> essential to your health.
08/11/2017 21:23 GMT