12/02/2018 17:34 GMT | Updated 12/02/2018 17:34 GMT

The Queen Backs Plans To Reduce The Use Of Plastics At Royal Residences

Plastic straws will be phased out in public-facing cafes at royal residences.

The Queen has given her royal approval to plans to reduce the use of plastics in the kitchens and cafes of royal estates including Buckingham Palace.

The changes include the phasing-out of plastic straws in public cafes at royal residences. They will be banned in staff dining rooms and takeaway containers for staff will be biodegradable or compostable.

In addition, disposable plates and cutlery will be replaced with reusable alternatives across public cafes in Windsor Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh, as well as Buckingham Palace. 

“The Royal Household is committed to reducing its environmental impact,” a spokesperson for Buckingham Palace told HuffPost UK.

“As part of that, we have taken a number of practical steps to cut back on the use of plastics. At all levels, there’s a strong desire to tackle this issue.” 

Press Association

Buckingham Palace joins a range of organisations reducing the use of plastics in its processes. Since the beginning of 2018, supermarket Iceland and travel companies such as Ryanair and Eurostar have all announced their commitment to going plastic-free.

If the current rate of marine plastic pollution continues, it will outweigh fish by 2050, according to the Environmental Audit Committee.

Last month, during a speech announcing a 25-year environmental plan, Theresa May referred to plastic waste as “one of the great environmental scourges of our time.”

According to the Telegraph, the Queen has reportedly been working with Sir David Attenborough on a documentary about wildlife in the Commonwealth, which is said to have further piqued Her Majesty’s interest in the environment and living sustainably.

PA Archive/PA Images
Queen Elizabeth II with Sir David Attenborough during an event at Buckingham Palace, London, to showcase forestry projects that have been dedicated to the new conservation initiative - The Queen's Commonwealth Canopy (QCC).