ageing population

It's no lie that people are living longer. There are now five generations in the workforce - and this is going to become the norm. It'd be foolish to think that this won't change the way we hire and train our staff, so it's vital that businesses adapt too. That means understanding the need to hire and train staff differently.
For the lucky, access to healthcare is a given. It is there when we need it, just as any basic human requirement should be
The challenges created by social care are immense. And they cannot be solved with token gestures. What's needed is a serious settlement, a blueprint that will ensure we have a properly funded and efficient system that will withstand the rapidly changing demands of an ageing population. A robust system that can meet everyone's needs. When Theresa May became leader, she pledged to deliver a country that works not just for the privileged few but for everyone. To follow through on that promise, the government must come up with a plan to resolve the crisis in social care.
An extraordinary second Monday in December may have heralded long-awaited government action to tackle the care crisis. With more than a million older people not getting the help they need and cash-strapped local authorities squeezing fees to fragile care businesses, the care system seems close to collapse. Now all eyes are on the government's funding settlement for councils later this week. Will it simply allow councils to raise council tax to fund care or will it offer something more fundamental?
Photo credit: Roswitha Chesher We are all living longer. Last year there were half a million people aged 90 and over living
In all the debate about the funding and integration of health and care, too little attention has been paid to housing. Yet
Without extra funding for social care this promises to be a long hard winter for our health and social care systems. The most visible manifestation of the pressures caused by cuts to social care budgets is the rapid growth in delayed transfers of care from hospital. The September figure of over 196,000 delayed days was a record. A record in delayed discharges not in winter, but at the end of summer.
When we think about an ageing population and our neighbourhoods of the future, there are a couple of perspectives that spring to mind. Let's start with the essence - but one that is too easily forgotten - and that is the end-user him/or herself.
Many people think about these issues too late. For others life events happen and prevent them from saving or contributing to a pension. For many others there simply isn't the money to save when the bills are paid. The Centre for Ageing Better wants more people to feel prepared for later life. We will be exploring how we can contribute to this goal in coming months.
Should we give up on retirement? As life expectancy rises and the number of people living into their 80s and 90s increases, at the very least we'll have to rethink it.