Blairism

With the prospect of a new Conservative leader looking ever more likely and Jeremy Corbyn secure in his position, wings of
Today's economic mauling of the poor and the vulnerable has ushered into being a brutal dystopia for those at the bottom of society and a wondrous utopia for those at the top.
Tony Blair is rightly unpopular for a number of reasons, yet what he achieved as a politician, in revolutionising his party after 20 years of upheaval, was nothing short of remarkable. Real prosperity and real investment was delivered and I just can't understand why today's party is prepared to turn its back on that in favour of becoming an electoral irrelevance.
The malaise within the Labour Party runs deeper than even its most sternest critics could have conceived. It is measured in the fact that Ed Miliband's defeat in the election and demise as leader was a cause for celebration not only by a victorious Tory Party but also by the Blairites within Labour's own ranks.
If the Tories in Scotland and the SNP could cast a vote between November 17, when the ballot commences, and December 13, when the new leader is announced, you can be sure it would be for Jim Murphy. Why? Because with Murphy as leader the likelihood of a Tory government at Westminster in 2015 increases to the point of being guaranteed.
What Miliband's speech outlined for the conference delegates and the country at large was reheated Blairism, confirming that in the struggle for the soul of the Labour Party after his election as leader of the party in 2010, the Blairites have won.