faith

Next to no changes, acceptances or even considerations have been made in that report. Keep to the status quo, don't change, ignore any concerns and bravery from those who said 'Yes, I'm gay and I love God. So what.'
After months of the constant cry for Theresa May to lay out her Brexit strategy, in the past two weeks we have heard more. Unsurprisingly I don't feel any more in the know! I didn't expect to be - revealing your negotiating position is a bit like playing poker with your cards laid out in front of you.
On the annual World Day of Migrants and Refugees, I feel compelled to draw attention to the reality of child migrants, especially the ones who are alone. In doing so I ask everyone to take care of the young, who in a threefold way are defenceless: they are children, they are foreigners, and they have no means to protect themselves. I ask everyone to help those who, for various reasons, are forced to live far from their homeland and are separated from their families.
Segregation is damaging for everyone. It's damaging for the minorities who could find themselves excluded from the best schools, but also for the kids with parents of the "right" faith. Wouldn't every child benefit from mixing with a variety of children from a variety of backgrounds?
Kati is my wife. Kati is the young woman who suffered a stroke in 1995 and since that has been almost entirely paralyzed. Kati is a woman that has spent almost her entire adult life trapped inside her body. Kati is also the person that knows how to enjoy life at the moment to the fullest making the most of each and every day.
Following the publication of the long-awaited review of integration by Louise Casey, I want to spend a little time considering its findings and implications.
It would be easy enough to see faith and language as insurmountable barriers, but these two negatives can come together to provide a solution for integration if we access the assets or social capital present across faith communities.
There is a contradiction at the heart of the role that religion plays today in our national life. On the one hand, the number of people describing themselves as non-religious has increased dramatically - from one in eight in England and one in three in Scotland in 2001 to almost half the UK population today.
Sitting on the breathtaking cliffs of Phuket for lunch one stormy afternoon and discussing heavy subjects such as self-realisation and politics, my new friend Ammy suddenly piped up, "Picking up rubbish.
Belief is a challenge, there no doubt about that. Many find that their faith is taken aback by the things we see around us and the circumstances of life. Often the most earnest question asked of Christians is 'how does a good God allow such suffering?'