Hare

I’ve been contributing some work recently to an upcoming book, all about Suffolk chefs and their favourite producers. One
As soon as Theresa May stepped out onto Downing Street, and announced that the country would go to the polls on June 8th
Therese Coffey said during the debate that Britain has the highest animal welfare standards in the world. When it comes to snares, that's utter nonsense - we're practically alone in Europe when it comes to allowing their use. I believe that it's time for the Government to back up those words with action. It's time for a ban on snares.
I didn't catch the hare; I found it lying by the side of the road after midnight as I drove back from a comedy gig in Bath. I was only 300 metres from home when I saw this soft, golden pile of fur curled up at the bottom of the hedgerow and I hit the brakes sharply.
We represent the vast majority of the British public who abhor the killing of animals for 'sport'. People should realise that if they support fox hunting, then they support the violence and gut-wrenching horror described above, and that they are going against the will of the public. And we need police authorities, in some cases, to start taking all this more seriously.
When people think of shooting, for some it conjures up nostalgic images of strolling through the countryside, taking in the views, and a delicious roast at the end of the day. The reality of course is somewhat different. In Britain, the bird-shooting industry is little more than canned hunting. And it is arguably one of the biggest animal welfare issues in the country today.
Unfortunately, the people who want rid of the Hunting Act have friends in high places, and even this weekend we heard confirmation from a Conservative spokesperson that the Government pledge to repeal the Act remains on the table.
I've been wracking my brain to work out why anyone would hate a hare. Some might say 'farmers', believing that hares go to work on their crops in the same way that rabbits do, however that's not true. Scientific reports show that the damage hares do to crops is minimal, and they might even have a beneficial effect in some cases.
Contrary to pro-hunt propaganda, the Hunting Act was not brought in to stop people killing foxes (or deer, hares and other mammals traditionally hunted with packs of dogs); it was brought in to stop these animals being killed in the cruellest of ways.
This Easter weekend, most of us will be excitedly looking forward to receiving some chocolate, usually in the shape of an egg or perhaps even a bunny. But how did the rabbit become so inextricably linked with Easter traditions?