incontinence

Vaginal mesh operations could soon be banned in England under proposed recommendations from the National Institute for Health
The morning after I gave birth, I got out of bed, and a cascade of wee followed. I had lost all my bladder control. It was so humiliating, and really embarrassing to try and get the nursing staff to come and clean up.
We’re all guilty of holding in wee every now and then. But could holding in a full bladder be ruining your health? It depends
A lot of people in the UK have a weak pelvic floor, but the problem is we Brits don't talk about it! In fact according to recent research 60% of British women feel embarrassed about their incontinence and 46% have learned to "just live with it". It's a real taboo, but it's not like this everywhere.
When you have a baby one of the many things you don't expect to use indefinitely is nappies. You look in to the not so distance future and envisage *the joys of* potty training and eventually a nappy-free life.
The last female hygiene taboo is finally being smashed.
Incontinence - the term for unintentional passing of urine - affects between three and six million people in the UK, yet
It's no surprise that we're often unwilling to talk about our bowels, but if we were more open about the number of trips we take to the bathroom or spoke freely about changes in colour, odour, and texture then it could be truly life changing. Important health issues could be diagnosed and addressed much sooner.