international aid

The young women I met in Somaliland worry about the same things I do, but they are feeling fear instead of relief. Hunger is hurting families in Somaliland. Women, girls and mothers deserve our support. It's time to act before things get worse.
In terms of its ambition and scope, nothing quite like the Global Goals has ever been attempted. If successful, the impact on all our lives would be profound. It would be one of our defining accomplishments, but if we don't take these principles of cooperation on board, we may well be placing humanity's greatest endeavour out of our reach even before the ink has set on its agreement.
El Nino has caused the lowest recorded rainfall across parts of Southern Africa in decades. Crops and livestock are dying as drought takes hold. El Nino has already made more than 34 million people hungry in Eastern and Southern Africa. That number is set to double in the next 12 months.
The Global Goals could be the catalyst for global change but the battle for transformative progress on ending poverty and inequality and the fight for gender equality does not end with these commitments - in many ways we are still at the beginning.
There is a small country whose citizens often go out of their way to help other nations. Its government is always the first
Glastonbury festival organisers on Tuesday donated tickets to next year's event for an auction to raise money for refugees
There's another side to the great gogglebox in the corner of our living rooms. TV - in fact British TV specifically - has been the driving force behind humanitarian work that has helped millions of the world's most desperate people. I'm the chair of trustees of the Disasters Emergency Committee, which represents the UK's leading international aid agencies when fundraising for humanitarian emergencies. The DEC has been phenomenally successful, in 67 appeals it has raised more than £1.5billion, including £352million for the Tsunami, £97million for the Philippines Typhoon and, more recently £83 million for the Nepal Earthquake appeal.
One of the things I love about my job is that I get to be optimistic every day. That's because I, and my colleagues working in international development, look at the problems of the world that are rooted in poverty and inequality, and refuse to accept that the world is not smart enough or rich enough to defeat them.
The 7.9 magnitude earthquake that hit Nepal on Saturday morning can only be described as a 'nightmare waiting to happen'. Mega-quakes like this one happen roughly every 80 years in Nepal, with over 9000 people being killed the earthquake of 1934. When I visited last year the possibility of another devastating earthquake was a matter of 'when' rather than 'if', however Nepal was in no way prepared for it...
The Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa is unprecedented in not only the scale of the epidemic but its spread. It has overwhelmed national health systems and left international experts wondering how to address an epidemic on such a scale.