lamb

The world of food blogging is very picture-led these days, which is both a good thing and a bad thing. It's a good thing
The world of food blogging is very picture-led these days, which is both a good thing and a bad thing. It's a good thing
Being the host this Easter doesn’t have to cost you a fortune.  Good Housekeeping has released its annual Easter guide of
One pot stop for a wonderful meal.
We want an experienced shepherd, able to move their flock of sheep to ensure that sensitive habitats get the grazing they need. Plantlife Cymru have kindly offered to purchase the farmer's new flock. The National Trust will offer the successful applicant expert conservation and farming support, as well as providing a farmhouse with picture-perfect views over the North Wales coast.
So-called 'extreme hunters' like giraffe killer Rebecca Francis regularly and deservedly receive public shaming, but few of us think twice about grinning at our lamb chops come dinner time.
Nothing says Easter quite like a mouth-watering, slow-cooked lamb dish. In the above video, Rich Harris from Scoff demonstrates
My sister and I have been busy cooking up a storm in the battle to find out which of us is the better chef. Olivia, who's
It's simple, really. It's not about flavour or fat content at all. If lamb wants to find its way into more American mouths, it just needs to get onto the promotional bandwagon, toot its own horn, and recast itself as "the Cute Meat" or "Lamb - we're not all baaaaad" or similar slogan. Hire Beyonce to one-up Lady Gaga and wear a lamb dress.