Manifesto

Schools And Education Conservatives: Maintain the amount of funding schools receive per pupil. Introduce "tough" new standards
'Who are you going to vote for, June?' - This is the question I am regularly being asked by friends and colleagues. But what is the option? Do I vote for the political leader or the manifesto?
Every time I go online at the moment, I'm slapped in the face with some infographic or digital countdown clock indicating how long I have until I cast the one vote that will help shape Britain's political landscape for the next five years.
Each party has this week outlined some key policies in the interest of the UK digital economy and IT professionals across the country. Each has their individual strengths and flaws, but overall it is pleasing to see the issue being addressed and not completely ignored.
Establishing a definitive strategy with regards to property and estate agency legislation is no straightforward matter. The fact that house prices are influenced by market forces will always mean that tinkering with the system is inherently complex and, indeed, risky.
In a world of coalitions, manifesto promises are even more open to change than they would be following a more predictable general election. As political ideologies will inevitably clash in any coalition agreement, compromises are going to be necessary.
The political parties seek to differentiate themselves on issues such as the NHS, immigration, the economy, mental health, education, nationalism, the environment, austerity, and much else. But science rarely seems to rank as even a second-tier area for political differentiation...
Britain needs better broadband. It needs universally adequate broadband, in every city, every town and down every country lane. Broadband is the fourth utility. It is not a luxury, it is a necessity. Just as we need water to come out when we turn on the tap, we need broadband to work when we go online.
Law practitioners who were interviewed for the study also reported that dominant characters, usually professional men, often deliberately chose mediation because they believed that they would be able to control their partners best in this process.
I want my voice to be heard, but not only my voice, but that of my peers. So often it is translated that the millennial generation does not engage with politics, but I personally think it is better described as politics doesn't engage with us.