motivation

As a GCSE student this year, I felt as if I was in the same boat as thousands of students across the country - a boat that felt like it was sinking at some point during exam season. I was fed up, tired, bored and couldn't wait to finish the long months that swallowed up my time.
Fitness trainers share their top tips to keep you turning up at the gym.
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Most of us are well-versed on the physical and mental health benefits of regular exercise, but converting our good intentions
You'll run in circles wondering why the hell not. Wondering what you're doing wrong and what everyone else seems to be doing right. Wondering when somebody will look at you and say "you're perfect. You are enough" or, more importantly, when you will say it to yourself.
A wife or partner trying to keep your house free from the never-ending mountains of washing, somehow keeping the fridge stocked with food, and the house as clean as possible. And you also have a career, where you need to juggle all the competing demands that everyone else faces on a daily basis.
After all, the only thing worse than demotivated staff leaving, is demotivated staff staying and the cumulative impact of this is bad news for the UK economy and our future prosperity.
Most of what I know about productivity comes from times when I've been depressed and still have work I need to get done. Those times have taught me that productivity isn't really about motivation. It's about...
I love to stay connected with people who give positivity to me. Especially during trying times, I connect with my old friends and family and they always have a way of making me feel better. Call a dear friend or spend time with kids. Get in touch with positive, optimistic people. Their positivity will certainly reflect upon you, too.
There are many ways to build self-discipline, which is a good thing. If you're curious about what it takes, or you're looking for ideas, the best way to approach it is to start with a few simple hacks and then practice them daily.
He battled a mental illness for 18 months before he brought it to an end in 2011. But despite how my dad's life ended, he was, and still remains, the most positive person I have ever known. Always upbeat, he loved to sing, crack jokes, act the fool. A sociable and out-going bloke with so many friends, a loving husband, dad and grandad. He was all the proof anyone needed that mental illness can happen to anyone.