Muammar Gaddafi

Some of you may remember how David Cameron's victory lap in a still-jubilant Tripoli was marred by the release of an embarrassing cache of faxes. The faxes revealed the true price of Blair's infamous 'deal in the desert' with Gaddafi in 2004: a joint US-UK-Libyan operation to kidnap my client and his pregnant wife.
On 20 October it will be two years since the death of Muammar Muhammad Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi... Cut to the present: Muammar's favourite son Saif al-Islam is about to go on trial for a string of alleged offences (including war crimes) along with 37 others. Pre-trial proceedings began in Tripoli this week. The extravagant cruelty is obviously absent but is the trial of Saif and Co at least likely to be a fair process, the respectable flip-side to the shabby killing of Saif's father? Sadly, no, not really.
Despite the laughable hypocrisy, the benefits of celebrity environmentalism are obvious, even when they merely regurgitate inoffensive green buzzwords. They draw attention to unnoticed issues. They mobilise people. When they speak, we listen.
It seems the world police have called Syria's bluff. CIA-trained operatives have been deployed on the ground to help bolster the country's rebel forces, and Barack Obama is now within inches of attaining what David Cameron so embarrassingly failed to achieve in Britain: Congressional approval to fire a few hundred cruise missiles at Bashar al-Assad's living room.
One of the UK's most senior judges has slammed a Supreme Court decision to sit in secret for the first time, calling it an
The reality is that since the fall of Gaddafi's regime, there hasn't been a single day of peace. Once NATO left and journalists returned to their home bureaus, the situation has steadily worsened. The disarmament plan and the reintegration of militias into the army have failed.
We've all got TV cameras in our pockets these days and television sucks up the material with glee. From filming a knife-wielding man tasered by police outside Buckingham Palace to the helicopter crash in London ordinary people are newsgathering extraordinary events everyday. Everyone's a journalist now: bearing witness and reporting it on Twitter and YouTube.
A leading Libyan opponent of Colonel Gaddafi, forcibly returned to the north African country in a joint operation with the
A new report into the final hours leading to Muammar Gaddafi's death nearly one year ago has claimed that the Libyan dictator
Fresh video has emerged on YouTube purporting to show the lifeless corpse of Muammar Gaddafi being pulled around by rebel