Polio

A quarter of a century ago, a million children's lives were ruined or lost to Polio every three years - today that number is just 400 a year. A disease that was once endemic in 125 countries is now confined to just a small handful - in Nigeria, Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Migration is a fact of life. Humans have moved around the world for hundreds of thousands of years. It's hard to blame someone for wanting to improve his or her circumstances. My parents made the same decision when they realised I had polio. After he came to London my father never saw his parents again. My mum and dad made huge sacrifices for which I will always be grateful.
World Polio Day gives us the opportunity to do just that. It shines a light on the magnificent effort by the international community to almost eradicate only the second human disease in history, and galvanises our movement to act to get rid of polio completely.
As part of our month of determination, we're showcasing inspiring individuals who have shone in the harsh light of adversity
During my visit to the Unicef-supported Basic Education School for displaced grade one to four children at the Aleppo University I met a number of confident, upbeat children, not shy to ask tough questions... As a mother, I could not hold back my tears when a young girl got up and asked me: "When will this war end?"
Speaking from Syria, UNICEF health facilitator, Dr. Suliman Najem said that reaching remote communities is particularly challenging in a region that has been badly affected by the three-year old conflict.
One of the major obstacles is reaching populations in areas cut off by the conflict. In an effort to reach every child with vaccination coverage, UNICEF is supporting local NGOs and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent in sending mobile health teams to remote villages and areas affected by conflict.
More than six months after confirmation of the first polio case in Syria, Unicef continues to support efforts to tackle the outbreak in all parts of the country. The April nationwide polio round which started this week aims to reach 2.8million children across Syria with a special focus on hard-to-reach children in conflict zones and besieged areas...
For each new person promoting falsehoods about vaccines - the MDGs become that much harder to accomplish. In India, a country known for its political dysfunction, it has achieved extraordinary success by setting clear policy goals with adequate levels of funding and clear lines of responsibility.
Outside her village home, while her mother embroidered a striking pink sari, India's last polio victim looked shyly at the