rana plaza

I believe that the global apparel industry can lead change. If companies know how and where their products are made, they can take the steps needed to create fair and safe conditions for workers worldwide.
If customers better understood the differences in quality between cheap, low quality, throwaway items versus better quality and longer-lasting but higher-priced garments they may become more inclined to buy fewer but better clothes. And it may cost them no more.
Photo credit: Allison Joyce for VSO Bangladesh's garment factories are once again in the headlines. In April 2013, over 1,100
The gunmetal silver Lotus Roadster thunders into the car park of the 12th largest shopping centre in the world, the Bashundhara
The Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed two years ago this month, claiming the lives of more than 1,100 people. The
We must continue to fight for the rights of workers everywhere by ensuring that no one should be coerced or forced into unsafe work - especially not children - because that is all that is available to them. The children of the Rana Plaza disaster should be managing the factories of the future and their children should have options that those brave men and women never dreamed of. We will not get there until we ensure that all children everywhere have access to an education.
Unethically-produced clothing: it's a company's responsibility to refuse to sell it and the consumer's responsibility not to buy it. Right? Theoretically yes. But in practice, there are thousands of broke students all over Britain wanting the best deal on a new dress
On the first anniversary of the collapse, fashion students from University of the Arts London marched along Oxford Street urging shoppers to think about the question "who made your clothes?". It was not just a protest but a statement of intent; the young people who will be tomorrow's fashion industry leaders plan to do things differently.
A year ago this week 1,129 people lost their lives when the Rana Plaza in Bangladesh collapsed, trapping thousands of garment workers as it fell. 12 months on, much has changed, and much has remained static.