Social integration

We should be encouraging our local authorities to develop initiatives which bring different generations together for face-to-face interactions
The government has announced plans to improve integration, but no funding for English language lessons
Our country must choose a future that is united and open to all
In 2008, a Parliamentary Inquiry into Community Cohesion and Migration called upon the Government to be more proactive on integrating immigrants and to better support the communities that accommodate them. Fast forward nine years and today, a similar Inquiry by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Social Integration has powerfully restated some of the same key messages, albeit with much greater urgency. Why? Because over the past decade, the Government has overseen the largest single wave of in-migration that the British Isles have ever experienced but has done little to support either the new arrivals themselves, or the communities which receive them.
We all get that feeling sometimes that we are on the outside. Whether it was when we first joined a new football team. Or
4.4 million people. That's roughly the same population size as the Republic of Ireland or Croatia. Half of London. Or, put
Lord Rose of Monewden, the former CEO of Marks & Spencer, has now launched his 'let's stay in Europe' campaign based on a simple piece of dubious mathematics. He claims that every Briton will be 'better off' by £450 a year if the nation remains in the EU.
People with cerebral palsy can remember when SCOPE was called The Spastic Society. Now we have a culture where political correctness has overtaken and one cannot use the term 'disabled' or 'mentally handicapped' or even 'handicapped'; instead we have to use the terms 'less-abled' or 'learning difficulties'. Is this really required