stories

Essentially any time spent reading with a baby should be viewed like watching an episode of The Only Way Is Essex - nothing sensible, clever or barely coherent is going to happen. All you'll get is incoherent babbling and the overriding wish for the experience to be over (very) quickly.
Stories are everything these days. The proliferation of social media has allowed everybody to share their lives, telling
Sometimes it is the stories you hear of people who you know the least about, who you are furthest connected to, that touch you the most deeply; suffering or tragedy of another that makes you pause momentarily- and alters your sense of perspective thereon. This handful of little stories shared by LGBT+ Jamaicans exposes their struggle to live, love and be treated equally in a homophobic homeland, and sheds light on the key to survival that strings them together.
As a kid with AS, who suffered from limited empathy and theory of mind as a result, stories were always how I understood the world. I learnt empathy through fictional characters, through taking dilemmas I found in stories and applying them to my real life. (This created some problems when I went through the customary Enid Blyton phase. Most people don't describe things as "spiffing.")
I've been involved in several books that deal with sadness, one is even called 'The Sad Book'. It dealt with my feelings about my son's death. There is no happy ending. He doesn't come back to life. My first reason for writing it was because I wanted to sort out how I felt. The second was that children were asking me how I felt and I owed it to them to answer them straight. A third reason has emerged as people have started to read the book to each other: it gives people a chance to say what kind of feelings they have, how they've responded to loss or how they are handling feelings of sadness.
In the turbulence of our current social and political climate, stories are as important as ever. They offer gateways, mirrors and alternative possibilities, insights to ourselves and others, pathways and tools to reimagine our lives and realities.
As a contentious U.S. election took over the news worldwide in 2016, teachers told us they wanted an app that more directly helped them prompt conversations about empathy with kids. Angry political speech that was dividing the country was trickling down into classrooms
all women everywhere As a black straight woman, from a working class background in Britain, my story may be very different to that of another woman who has not had to experience the same forms of discrimination. All stories are valid, illuminate our experience and highlight the diversity within diversity.
I was always writing when I was growing up in care. Not just creative writing, but also writing lots of letters to my social workers and to charities about my situation and what should be happening. I believe that all children in care want to write their story. It gives back some form of control, as when you're in care everything is written about you in your social services file which you don't always see. This builds a drive within to get our stories heard.
There are only seven types of story in the world. And thanks to the books we read, and the films and TV shows we watch, we've experienced them all hundreds of times...