Women in Technology

Women currently make up less than a quarter of the UK’s science, technology, engineering and maths workforce.
Does romance really trigger a more powerful response than other areas of our lives? Certainly liking an announcement can simply be a way of wishing people well, but why not care as much about announcements in other aspects of life?
all women everywhere Many of today's twenty-somethings don't realise that they have the potential to hold a technology role, without the need to code. There are skills required between professional careers and trade work, meaning they combine technical skills with a knowledge base rooted in higher education.
Ultimately, all of us need to make the right choices to ensure we use technology to develop skills in a way that helps everyone to succeed. This needs to be our response to the challenges posed by technology and globalisation - and it's everyone's responsibility.
As long as men in STEM continue to unconsciously perpetuate poor workplace habits through lack of confidence we'll have a big problem on our hands. A diverse workforce is maintained by a combination of retention, attraction and hiring of diverse talent. Improving men's willingness and ability to challenge these norms, and redefine the status quo, will help to ensure that we have a comprehensive solution.
The discovery of my old school magazine from 1987 has made me even more proud to be associated with Founders4Schools, an
I'm a senior software engineer. I've been doing this job now for sixteen years. Most of the time when I'm at work, I'm not thinking about the gender of myself or my colleagues. I don't think "Ugh! It's a man!" every time I sit down next to one of them. I also don't think "Ooooh! A man!" I don't even think, "Hmmm, another one of those man-people."
As the stereotype goes, geeks are weird and socially inept. All you have to do is look at TV, news and the other elements of popular culture to find out why. Think back to watching cartoons like Dexter's Lab and you'll notice how from a young age we are fed the notion that geeks are unfashionable.
Companies can make a difference by acknowledging the issue and working on any internal imbalances. Adding talented women to the executive team, giving promotions and making women feel valued, as well as inspired.
When I'm asked about the best piece of advice I would give to any woman seeking a career in the fields of science, technology, education and mathematics (STEM) - where government figures show that women hold just 15.5% of jobs - my first response is to pick a good mentor.