Medical Research

Out of Sight, Out of Mind

Mike Daw | Posted 12.10.2015 | UK
Mike Daw

Most of us would consider our sight to be one of the most important senses, and fear the impact that sight loss would have on our independence. But eye health, in comparison with other diseases, is still largely neglected by medical research funding.

Seeing Our Way to a Healthy Future

Mike Daw | Posted 24.09.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Mike Daw

Research can make a huge difference, 25 years ago a corneal transplant had a 50/50 chance of success - now it has a 90 percent chance. Cataract procedures are now routine, laser eye surgery is nowadays a very safe procedure - but that is only through years of research.

Wasn't I Born to be Loved?

Sharon Bull | Posted 03.06.2015 | UK
Sharon Bull

Surely, the time has to come when animals being used in laboratories is written off into the history books and looked down upon as the antiquated and callous practise that it is.

What to Live Longer? Don't Ask a Mouse

Victoria Martindale | Posted 22.06.2015 | UK
Victoria Martindale

The leading causes of death have changed markedly over the years. A century ago, infections were the leading causes of death. Today, we will probably survive much longer than our ancestors but it is more likely we will die of age related diseases like mobility problems, arthritis and Alzheimer's or other chronic diseases like heart disease, cancer or stroke.

Could 'Personalised' Cancer Vaccines Be On The Cards?

The Huffington Post UK | Natasha Hinde | Posted 23.04.2015 | UK Lifestyle

Personalised cancer vaccinations could soon be on the cards, according to a new study. A vaccine, which is designed to work on individual patients,...

Will Voting Be Bad for Your Health?

Mia Rozenbaum | Posted 24.05.2015 | UK Politics
Mia Rozenbaum

Like most people, when I go to vote next may, the first thing I'll have in mind will probably not be the cure for dementia that could help my mother in 20 years' time, or the cure for autism that might help my child in years to come, or even the treatment for cancer that could save my life in 50 years' time.

Apple Just Turned The iPhone Into A Medical 'Tricorder'

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 10.03.2015 | UK Tech

Apple has unveiled ResearchKit, a program that allows researchers to turn your iPhone 6 into a powerful medical analytics tool. Apps built through ...

How Astronomers Looking For Alien Planets Actually Found... Cancer

Huffington Post UK | Michael Rundle | Posted 05.02.2015 | UK Tech

Astronomers are looking for cancer. In space. Kinda. A report from the University of Cambridge points out that one of the surprising spin-offs from...

Why Wearing A Scarf This Winter Could Stop You From Getting A Cold

The Huffington Post UK | Natasha Hinde | Posted 06.01.2015 | UK Lifestyle

'Tis the month of sniffles, sneezes and snot. If you're fed up of catching colds then you'll certainly want to take note of a new health study fro...

HIV Testing Saves Lives: But Is HIV Testing the Best Prevention?

Dr Steve Taylor | Posted 30.01.2015 | UK Lifestyle
Dr Steve Taylor

The awareness-raising we and many others have been doing this week is truly crucial in the fight against HIV: because the stigma that surrounds the infection, and that at least one of our celebrity ambassadors has noticed on social media in this last week, drives a reluctance to test which actively promotes the continued spread of HIV.

Stifling Scientific Criticism of Animal Research Is a Desperate Maneuver

Troy Seidle | Posted 20.01.2015 | UK
Troy Seidle

Open and honest discourse and the free exchange of views is the cornerstone of scientific enquiry. Without it, ideas stagnate, progress is delayed, and the status quo prevails -- not because it deserves to, but because alternate viewpoints have been stifled.

Doctors Put A 'Dead' Heart Inside A Living Person, And It Worked

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 24.10.2014 | UK Tech

Doctors at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney have successfully transplanted dead hearts into living people in what might be one of the technological and...

If This Disease Was a Cancer, We'd Be Spending Millions to Fight It - So Why Are We Ignoring It?

Dr Penny Woods | Posted 05.12.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Dr Penny Woods

This cancer kills most people it strikes, often with devastating speed. While around 85% of breast and prostate cancer patients are still alive five years after diagnosis, just 20% survive as long with this cancer. Barely half survive just three years.

Better Science Without Animal Suffering Showcased at World Congress on Alternatives 2014

Troy Seidle | Posted 10.11.2014 | UK
Troy Seidle

Humane Society International's global #BeCrueltyFree team has just returned from the World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Science...

6 Million UK Adults have never had an eye test, shocking research reveals neglect of eye health

Antonia Mariconda | Posted 13.10.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Antonia Mariconda

Could an eye test really signal the end of an era of perfect vision? me in glasses?, surely not, suddenly I found a multitude of vain reasons to avoid an eye test.

Your iPad Could Be Giving You A Rash

The Huffington Post UK | Thomas Tamblyn | Posted 14.07.2014 | UK Tech

Got a strange rash? Well it turns out the cause could well be your iPad Air. New research has suggested that Apple's tablet could contain traces of ni...

Memories Are Worth Fighting for - the 21st Century Way

Troy Seidle | Posted 21.07.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Troy Seidle

Progress is urgently needed in understanding Alzheimer's disease and in finding effective treatments. Available drugs can help stabilise memory loss and confusion for a few months in about half of patients, but no preventative treatments exist and none that slow the inexorable development of the disease.

World Day for Animals in Laboratories 2014

Victoria Martindale | Posted 23.06.2014 | UK
Victoria Martindale

Countries like the EU, Israel and India have already banned the use of animals in cosmetic testing because animals don't predict the human response. We know this. We know that animals do not provide biologically meaningful human substitutes- and yet we continue to sustain these methods in medical research with our funds and faith.

Robin Hood 2.0: A New Hope for Cancer Patients?

Dr Penny Woods | Posted 13.06.2014 | UK
Dr Penny Woods

It is estimated that more than 60,000 people will die from this dreadful disease over the next 30 years unless new treatments are discovered. Yet research into meso - the only thing that is likely to find those treatments - is shamefully underfunded, receiving a fraction of the investment received by diseases that kill similar number of people, such as skin cancer.

Biomedicine's Male Bias Is Yet Another Example of Everyday Gender Inequality... and More

Victoria Martindale | Posted 25.05.2014 | UK
Victoria Martindale

If the differences between sexes of the same species are so profound and diverse then imagine the differences with other species with whom we share even less genetics, biochemistry and physiology.

Medical Research Is Not Funded By Selfies

Emma Watts | Posted 19.05.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Emma Watts

My facebook timeline was flooded with selfies this morning. Bare-faced, no-filter (ahem) selfies, posted by friends in the name of cancer awareness and asking others to do the same. In my usual bleary-eyed, early morning confusion I couldn't understand why, on a social networking site where most of us scroll mindlessly through the interminable selfies of the people on our friends list every single day, another selfie would help cure cancer.

Stem Cell 'Breakthrough' Could Lead To New Era Of Personalised Medicine

Huffington Post UK | Posted 29.01.2014 | UK Tech

A "revolutionary" new approach to creating stem cells in the laboratory could open up a new era of personalised medicine, it is claimed. Scientists...

How Your Medical Records Could Save Lives

Professor Peter Weissberg | Posted 16.03.2014 | UK Lifestyle
Professor Peter Weissberg

We've seen examples of this in the past where researchers have been able to highlight aspects of lifestyle that affect the risk of developing disease. This past week marked the 50th anniversary of the US Surgeon General report on smoking, which for the first time in the US highlighted the significant health harms to the general public from smoking.

Is Cruelty the Institutionalised Standard in Animal Research?

Victoria Martindale | Posted 16.02.2014 | UK
Victoria Martindale

If it takes an undercover investigation, a review by an independent committee of experts, 65,000 signatures on a petition and an ongoing Home Office inquiry to bring these shameful acts of cruelty in one of our most prestigious Universities to light what hope is there for animal welfare standards in laboratories across the country?

Cures for the Leading Diseases in the Western World are on the Horizon

Troy Seidle | Posted 03.02.2014 | UK
Troy Seidle

Instead of gambling our medicines -- and our lives -- upon these dismal stakes, scientists can make more meaningful predictions about the effectiveness of new therapies in humans and about their safety that are relevant to people in the real world, and intercept the progression of disease before a patient even receives their diagnosis.