Lenah Ueltzen-Gabell

Executive vice president, Europe and Middle East, Wasserman


Lenah Ueltzen-Gabell is an active member of the international sports and entertainment industry. She is executive vice president, Europe and Middle East, at Wasserman, and oversees the commercial, ‘off the pitch’ side of the agency’s business. She joined Wasserman in 2008 and since then, her team’s brand and property work has spanned 81 markets around the world across both sports and entertainment including key notable brand clients such as PepsiCo, Bacardi, RSM and American Express.

Within the commercial practice, Wasserman is most notably recognised for its boutique consulting practice as the go-to agency when global brands seek to understand the international market landscape and make educated sponsorship decisions to drive their brands whilst meeting key business objectives.

Ueltzen-Gabell was inducted into SportsBusiness Journal’s Forty Under 40. She comments on the business of sport on channels including the BBC, and is involved in the exclusive international Women in Sport alliance and the board of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC).

Before entering the corporate world, Ueltzen-Gabell was an award-winning equestrian, victorious on the national stage at prestigious events such as the National Horseshow held at New York City’s Madison Square Garden.

She currently lives in London.
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