Richard Shotton

Deputy Head of Evidence at MG OMD. Interested in how social psychology can make advertising more effective.

Would Marketers Rather Fail Conventionally, Than Succeed

Would Marketers Rather Fail Conventionally, Than Succeed Unconventionally?

Mark Ritson's described marketers as magpies, flitting from one fad to another. He judged them guilty of spending too much time and budget on emergent opportunities at the expense of established ones. This flightiness leads to media investment out of kilter with customer behaviour and large investments in areas with unproven ROI.
15/09/2016 16:58 BST
What Can Medieval Peasants Teach Us About Marketing

What Can Medieval Peasants Teach Us About Marketing effectiveness?

They did this because they were loss averse: they knew that whilst a surplus of food was favourable, a lack of food was fatal. In fact this attitude to risk has been a facet of human development for so long that evolutionary psychologists think that we're hard wired to be loss averse.
07/09/2016 14:49 BST
Should Marketing Be More

Should Marketing Be More Theatrical?

The main point is that the wit of an ad is not just a creative issue but also one of media placement. The perception of humour can be boosted through channel selection or implementational tactics.
01/09/2016 12:09 BST
The Problem With Brand

The Problem With Brand Purpose

Is it possible that there's a common approach shared by the world's most successful brands? It's not surprising that the most successful brands had performed well financially in previous years. If they hadn't delivered shareholder returns, they wouldn't be in the top 0.1% of brands. It's a circular piece of logic.
26/08/2016 11:03 BST
Brand Strength Comes From Admitting

Brand Strength Comes From Admitting Weakness

So why do imperfections make people and products more attractive and, more importantly, how can brands apply these insights? First, admitting weaknesses makes brands seem more human. In an age when many prefer the authentic to the mass produced, this boosts appeal.
18/08/2016 15:13 BST
The Danger of Gorging on Advertising

The Danger of Gorging on Advertising Data

An unbounded enthusiasm for data is dangerous and advertisers should avoid harnessing data merely because it exists. Instead, as much time, energy and effort should be expended in choosing which data sets to ignore as which to use. Advertisers who resist this painful cull, and gorge on data, might end up regretting it.
12/08/2016 10:28 BST
What Modern Brands Can Learn From the

What Modern Brands Can Learn From the Victorians

If you had been strolling through Leicester on a crisp winter's day in 1881, you might have spotted a strange sight: an elephant lumbering down the high street harnessed to a giant wheel of cheese.
20/06/2016 13:38 BST
Do Ad Agencies Discriminate When

Do Ad Agencies Discriminate When Hiring?

Imagine you had two applicants for a graduate vacancy. Both are well-qualified, with strong academic credentials, plenty of work experience and a passion for advertising. How would you choose between them?
09/06/2016 11:21 BST
Brexit, Brands and the Butterfly

Brexit, Brands and the Butterfly Effect

One winter's day in 1961, Professor Edward Lorenz - one of the first meteorologists to use computer-based prediction - decided to run a weather simulation in his MIT lab. He'd run this one before, so he was pretty sure he knew what to expect. But on this occasion, to save time, he inputted the data using three decimals places, rather than six as he had used originally. So, for example, 23.348 rather than 23.347813: a difference of just 0.000187.
31/05/2016 14:13 BST
The Implicit Power of Sports

The Implicit Power of Sports Sponsorships

2016 will be a record-breaking year for sports sponsorships. Brands will be clamouring to attach their names to both the regular annual events but also the two quadrennial extravaganzas: the Rio Olympics and UEFA Euro 2016.
19/05/2016 14:22 BST