animal research

In the UK, animal experiments are carried out under highly regulated conditions, and are only allowed where there are no non-animal methods that can be used instead. Animals are not used for testing tobacco (banned in 1997) or cosmetics (banned in 1998), but research is carried out to continue to make progress on the many diseases which remain a scourge on humanity.
Thousands of animals could be saved from undergoing medical procedures in veterinary training schools worldwide, thanks to
World Day for Laboratory Animals on 24 April was originally established by animal rights activists to raise awareness for
Mention animal testing, and it's likely you'll be met with a barrage of very strong opinions on either side, from those who
Understanding Animal Research has written to all major supermarkets and cosmetic retailers, urging them to put additional information in their stores to help inform the public. Such actions would help clear a misconception which is affecting over half of the British public.
Researchers, such as AB Failloux and her team, are looking at the mosquito to study its susceptibility to contract the Zika virus but also the progression and evolution of the virus in the insects.
Ten years ago today, on a cold Saturday morning in Oxford, I was standing in Oxford city centre watching hundreds of people congregate to rally - not against - but in favour of constructing a new animal research laboratory at the University of Oxford.
Animals are potentially suffering and it is right to acknowledge that in full, but they are also not suffering for no reason. Granted, they are likely suffering less than the general public already believe them to be.