arms trade

The atrocities have not just been ignored by Whitehall and Downing Street, they have been directly fuelled by them. Theresa May and her colleagues have not been spectators to the bombardment, they have been active participants. It's time for them to end their complicity.
Theresa May with King Salman of Saudi Arabia. Copyright, Number 10. It was apparently without irony that the UK Mission to
Over the last 40 years the Saudi regime has executed thousands of people, suppressed millions more, and have created a humanitarian catastrophe in Yemen. Serious questions are being asked about the regime's role in the funding of terrorism and violence. Yet, despite its long list of abuses, it has been supported every step of the way by Westminster.
Attention is focusing on over $100bn worth of U.S. arms sales to Saudi Arabia, understandably so. The Saudi dictatorship backed by the United States is given diplomatic and military cover as it razes Yemen to the ground. If you're somehow glued in the myth that the U.S. foreign policy is a force for democracy, a glance at the list of U.S. arms exports should rid you of those illusions.
There's a lot more one could say about Saudi Arabia's almost unimaginably bad human rights record. But unless something miraculous happens, Theresa May won't mention of any of this during her time in Riyadh. A semi-ritualistic reference along the lines of "a range of issues were discussed, including human rights" is probably all we'll get.
Over the last two years a brutal humanitarian crisis has been forced on the people of Yemen. It has created the circumstances under which children are dying from preventable causes and people are risking their lives when they do something as normal as going to the market. The situation is dire, and unless urgent action is taken now then there are large numbers who may not survive much longer.
Whatever happens next month it won't be the end of the debate. As long as terrible crimes are being committed with UK weapons and with our government's support, this campaign will continue. It's not just the arms sales that need to end, it is also the hypocrisy and the mindset that has allowed them to happen in the first place.
UK aircraft and UK bombs have been central to the bombardment, which, according to Save the Children, has left Yemen "teetering on the edge of famine." The situation is dire, but the government's response has been to evade and ignore it.
Last Sunday marked 500 days since Saudi Arabian forces intervened in the Yemeni civil war. In that time, Saudi air strikes have killed thousands of people, destroyed vital infrastructure and unleashed a humanitarian crisis on the civilian population.
For decades now, UK governments of all political colours have worked hand in glove with the arms companies and Saudi authorities, continuing to sell arms and political support while turning a blind eye to the terrible human rights abuses that are being carried out every single day.