assisted suicide

17-year-old, who was raped as a child, "did not die of euthanasia", say friends.
The law allows patients to request medication to end their lives. It gives them the choice to change their minds, too.
'The public is wiser and more compassionate than the law.' In The Times's Thunderer column Lucy Wainwright came to this conclusion
I am not, on this occasion, calling for the legalisation of physician assisted dying. The point I am trying to make is that English law is a mess which leads to secretive practices and a lack of clarity. Wherever the law decides to draw the line between what is lawful and what isn't that line should be clearly drawn so we all know with certainty what our rights are.
Not many writers of a stage musical would attempt to explore deeply contentious and troubling issues of the day. Big issues don't really lend themselves to up beat song and dance, and most audiences don't usually find themselves clapping along to show tunes with a serious edge...
Recently the debate around Assisted Dying has become a cause célèbre and is now one of the hottest topics of the 21st Century. The concept of assisting someone to die if they are terminally ill may seem a no brainer. Making it legal to assist in a person committing suicide if they feel they can no longer carry on, or that they fear what their impending death may bring, is portrayed in the media as a humanitarian act of compassion that any forward thinking caring society would allow.
People often say to me 'I am living!' Yes, we are all breathing, waking up in the morning and going to work and doing our best to get by. Yet, I wonder how many of us are merely existing. There is a vast difference between the two. Whilst this is something I have often pondered on (especially since the sudden passing of my mother), this film really brought it home to me.
It breaks my heart that in the 21st Century an author and publishing company, then followed by an entire movie company, producer, director and cast, feel that the world needs this type of story. Don't create a positive exploration of what is truly possible for disabled people, instead let's just go the for the easy stereotype eh?
I do not have a terminal illness and while when I was diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (a form of Muscular Dystrophy) the doctors said I likely wouldn't live past the age of four, I have never been told I have less than 6 months to live so the Bill would never have applied to me.
A BBC film documenting the months leading up to the death of a man who took his own life in an assisted suicide in Switzerland