bbc panorama

The landmark Panorama interview with the Princess of Wales is now the subject of a BBC investigation led by Lord Dyson.
Giuffre, formerly Virginia Roberts, says the Duke of York "knows what happened".
Last night, BBC's long running 'investigative' documentary programme, Panorama, aired its latest film on BBC One. The show entitled 'A Prescription For Murder' had been met with criticism from many mental health campaigners and professionals.
I found the documentary extremely distressing. As a very caring and empathetic person (traits that remain unchanged despite my exposure to SSRIs), I found it deeply upsetting that somebody who watched this programme could draw correlation between my profile and that of a serial killer. The BBC had a responsibility to safeguard a potential audience of SSRI takers whose lives had been benefitted by this drug, but of course, the experience of the majority was omitted from the programme.
To me, it seems like it is yet another case of trying to make sense of complex, rare cases that have resulted in tragedy. But remember, never blame the oh-so-sacred alcohol. Ideally, the show would be pulled and potentially redeveloped but at this time it looks like it will go ahead.
Doncaster Clinical Commissioning Group have bought into our services and every family in the town with a child age 12 months upwards can access our support services. This is our vision for the rest of the country, sleep support should be readily available and free within community settings.
These add-ons include pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS); endometrial scratch (which was the only add-on clinically proven to show some benefit); and additional bloods and immunology testing, to name but a few. New, experimental treatments with a significant or growing body of anecdotal evidence behind them are how many of these treatments could best be described
As evidenced by the tears of the women in last night's programme, infertility is brutal, physically and emotionally, and affects 1 in 7 couples. If my doctor had asked me for twice the price on the promise of heightened chances, I'd have handed it over without a moment's thought. That is why the ethics at play in last night's TV made for such unsettling viewing.
As devastating as this week's BBC Panorama programme on Syrian refugee children working in Turkish garment factories was, its revelations do not surprise anyone with even a rudimentary knowledge of the garment industry.
I'd been told that child labour was endemic in Turkey, but I wasn't prepared for the reality of it. Or the scale of it. One basement workshop was almost entirely staffed with children, many of whom couldn't have been more than seven or eight years old, the very picture of Dickensian misery.