big brother watch

Civil liberties group Big Brother Watch has described the use of the technology as an "epidemic".
It comes after a man was filmed being stopped and fined for covering his face as he passed a facial recognition van.
Go on, delete your account - you’ll be surprised how little you’ll miss it.
Facial recognition sounds fairly benign. Right now you are probably visualising a policeman watching 100's of television screens showing CCTV images looking out for known criminals lingering in the crowd. Well, that might have been the case in the past, but with this technology the process is automated by an intelligent computer programme.
Big Brother Watch: surveillance Bill moving 'too fast'
The Government risks undermining civil liberties by trying to push through its ‘snoopers’ charter’ with little scrutiny from
Now that every aspect of our day to day lives is conducted online, our homes and cars are connected to the internet and data is the very life blood of society, it's no longer a case of nothing to hide nothing to fear.
The need for more information is given greater urgency by the words of Commander Richard Martin, head of intelligence and covert policing at the Met. In the article Commander Martin states that Communications Data is now routinely used in almost every criminal investigation.
This calm and well-informed approach is vital to ensure that no new legislation is rushed through to beat the sunset clause of December 2016 outlined in the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act.
Placing an entire population under surveillance whilst failing to adequately resource not only the intelligence agencies but those tasked with holding them to account, is both an unacceptable intrusion of our freedoms and creates nothing more than a chilling effect on free expression for anyone communicating in, or with, the UK.