blasphemy laws

Personally, I have little hope for the older generation of Muslims who have inherited over a century of anti-Ahmadi propaganda. Rather, it is my generation I have some hope for. With the knowledge available from the internet and the increased visibility of Ahmadis in society, perhaps they can look past the myopia of many of their forefathers.
Let us all, in our own ways, continue to work to ensure that the values for which Shahbaz lived, and died, did not die with him but live on, in all of us, and that those values - freedom of religion or belief for all; peace, harmony and respect between people of different faiths...
While we certainly cannot ignore the influence of religious fundamentalism worldwide in suppressing freedom of expression, I would submit that the future of free speech in Britain will depend rather on the willingness of those who believe in free speech to stand against criminalising offensive speech for its own sake...
Last week, Shahzad Masih and Shama Bibi, a Christian couple who had spent years in modern-day slavery in Punjab province in Pakistan, were brutally beaten and burned to death at the brick kiln where they work after they were accused of blasphemy for desecrating the Holy Qur'an.
As things stand, an innocent lady will be hanged in Pakistan without committing a crime, whilst those who openly boast of "chasing her through Hell" and seek her death will not even be investigated in the UK.
A British man jailed under Pakistan's blasphemy laws has spoken of his experience after he escaped to the UK. Masud Ahmad
A Pakistani Christian man has been sentenced to death for blasphemy. Sawan Masih was convicted on Thursday of using derogatory
Almost every day, among my friends, on the streets or tubes, or on television, I hear someone take the name of Jesus Christ in vain, turning his name into a swear word. I don't like it. I'd rather they didn't do it. But do I threaten to cut their heads off, or even stage an angry demonstration or organise a petition? Of course not.
By signing so much dissent-strangling legislation, by playing to the most reactionary elements in Russian society, by crushing popular protest and by harassing civil society, Putin is dragging Russia away from its obligations under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to respect freedom of opinion and expression.
Whilst the amnesty granted to the two imprisoned members of Pussy Riot - Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Mariya Alekhina - is to be welcomed, we must view it for what it is: a political stunt by the President of Russia, Vladimir Putin.