bpas

Times columnist Caitlin Moran suggested that those who appreciated the woman's defence of abortion rights donate to Kids
We know from the American experience we can't turn a blind eye to abortion opponents and just hope they'll go away. If we want to protect our rights, we really do need to talk about how much we cherish them. We need to talk about abortion.
There's a fresh chance to remove the anachronistic requirement that two doctors must authorise a woman's request for an abortion before it can be performed. On Thursday, a private members' bill to reduce the number of doctors required to authorise an abortion from two to one is to be introduced by Baroness Jenny Tonge in the House of Lords.
We should stop compartmentalising these interconnected areas of women's lives, and let a commitment to women's choice and autonomy underpin the reproductive health services that women will need across the three decades they are fertile. Let's support her choices, and let's trust her to decide.
The allegation by the Independent that there is a "war" on female foetuses by certain communities in this country is both unsubstantiated and extremely insulting to the people who belong to those communities. Nonetheless, the suggestion that any woman feels under pressure to bring a child of a certain sex into the world, and feels that she has failed if she delivers a girl, is intensely depressing and distressing... We may well find the notion of sex-selective abortion extremely disturbing, where it exists. But further curtailing women's already highly regulated reproductive choices will never be the answer to gender inequality.
Ann Furedi, the head of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (bpas), recently came under media fire for her piece in Spiked about the "danger of clamping down on sex-selective abortions".
It’s been a great year for the pro-life lobby. That’s the view of Mark Bhagwandin, Senior Education and Media Officer of
We see women who have become pregnant not long after giving birth, not realising how quickly fertility returned, or after misinformation about the protection breastfeeding provides against pregnancy. Sadly we also see women who simply haven't been able to negotiate contraceptive use with a reluctant partner, as well as women for whom a much wanted pregnancy is no longer possible after a dramatic change in personal circumstances. A recently conducted audit of all women contacting bpas for advice in 2011 found nearly two thirds were using contraception, including condoms, pills, patches and coils, when they became pregnant.
The abortion limit in Britain should be set according to what people believe rather than the science, the minister for women
It cannot be repeated enough that there has been no new medical evidence to suggest any scientific or medical reason for a reduction in the abortion time limit since this was last debated in the House of Commons in May 2008. This debate isn't being reopened because of any new medical evidence or the current figures on abortion, but because of a toxic, politicisation of the issue by elements within the Conservative Party. It is happening because Jeremy Hunt's gratuitous attack on British women's right to choose has opened the door to parts of the Tory party to begin unwanted and distracting wrangling in parliament to reduce the time limits.