breathing

Therapists explain how the well-meaning phrase can make some situations worse and share what to do instead.
Living in London is chaos. It's noisy, it's frantic, it's a city that is always moving and always on. For many Londoners these are the joys of the city, but at the same time are the things that can challenge the state of calm and balance in our everyday lives.
Anyway you look at it, beliefs about stabilising the core in order to get strong, protect the spine and have a good posture are rampant among friends, in communities, in society and in the media. Why on earth wouldn't you follow advice that appears to be endorsed by everyone, everywhere?
Wet weather leaving you sluggish? A little flat? Show some trust in the sun and you'll be amazed by the energy and vibrancy that's beamed your way (bonus points if you can hold your faith when you've just been caught in a freak April hailstorm).
I hadn't taken my shoes off and walked barefoot since last summer. But, a couple of weeks ago the sun was shining, the first signs of spring had emerged and I decided to indulge in being barefoot, my favourite method for bringing mind and body present, so that it is possible to hear the deeper stirrings of the soul.
The pauses between the conversations. The transitions from one place to another. Scientists tell us that matter is mostly space. In the same way our diaries, even the most intense ones, are actually full of gaps. They may be micro-moments but taken together they add up to huge amounts of empty potential
Lie down (woop!) with your child, and place teddy bears or soft toys on your bellies. Encourage your child to try some abdominal breathing by taking deep inhalations through their nose and and exhaling through their mouth.
I had thoroughly prepared for a positive birth experience, but not for one that went so far off plan. It took me a long time to be able to discuss the birth calmly, and even longer to forgive myself for decisions made in moments of panic.
Now if the decade I spent as a home-based wine rep taught me anything, it's that wearing pyjamas at midday is perfectly acceptable, and in no way related to productivity. In this case my husband had in fact been working for an hour, and the toddler and I had half-peeled a banana (it is sometimes related to productivity).
The most common response when I say to people that I'm a yoga teacher and that they should try it sometime is that "I'm just not flexible enough to do yoga". I love the analogy I recently saw comparing it to saying that you're too dirty to take a shower.